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  1. #1
    Senior Member Resdayn's Avatar
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    I quit smoking after 22 years

    Gentlemen,

    since Thursday the 14th, 2 AM my time, I haven't smoked a single cigarette, didn't have a single draw of a cigarette, but sometimes I DO miss it. All because I will have to undergo minor surgery a few weeks from now and the doctor told me to stop because non-smokers have their wounds heal much faster than smokers do, so I contacted my gp the week before stopping, sat down for a chat, told him that I'm going to quit, that I wanted to do it cold turkey, and if I need help I'll ask, no need to contact me and ask me how it's going. He agreed and told me I can call any time I need help or advice, so that was that.

    I bought one extra packet of tobacco (50 grams, as usual) during the weekend, smoked the last bit of tobacco until there was just this crumbled and dried out crap left, smoked that too until it was bedtime (Thursday 2 AM), tossed everything away and went to bed, realizing I was up for a challenge, even though I started with a positive attitude because of Allen Carr's book.

    Day 1, Thursday the 14th: went as expected. Didn't feel an urge to smoke for the first two hours after coming out of bed, but then it hit. I decided to take deep breaths, pace around and focus on other things. Feeling went away, but I was still quite anxious so I decided to clean and get my mind off things. That worked for about two hours and the craving came back. Called my parents, nobody home. Cleaned some more, played a video game or two, made dinner, called parents again, told them about me stopping (they already knew, but now WHEN I'd stop) and they obviously fully supported me. The evening went by at a snail's pace, but I managed to go to bed without taking a single drag.

    Day 2, Friday the 15th: the need for nicotine was lower, but I felt other withdrawal symptoms kicking in; shivers, shakes, weakness in my arms, extreme tiredness (since nicotine can act like caffeine and I missed various hits by then), so I took two naps during the day. Was too tired to go to my parents for dinner, so my dad came over to bring me some food and have a chat with me. I talked. A LOT. Like a nervous junkie who hasn't had a needle in his arm for too long, and my dad picked up on that, so he was calm and just listened until I gradually relaxed as well. Took another nap that evening and went to bed early. Managed to go to bed without taking a single drag again.

    Day 3, Saturday the 16th: now this day (yesterday) was a bitch. A true bitch. I was annoyed, aggressive, anxious, CRAVED nicotine, constantly hit the wrong keys on my keyboard while typing messages and was THIS close to bashing that thing into pieces. I was also THIS close to going to the store for tobacco and booze, but I once again called my parents, had a great 20-minute chat and all cravings went away. I even took a spontaneous 3,5 kilometer walk! No real need to nap that day and once again managed to go to bed without taking a single drag.

    Day 4, Sunday the 17th: today is good! I still kinda wish I had tobacco at home, but the physical need is gone. The psychological need is still there though, if subdued. I can already breathe easier and deeper, I can smell and taste better, I have more energy, and whenever something inside me tells me I could use a cigarette, I breathe in deeply, say "no I don't", breathe out, read something, and get rid of the cravings. I rode my bike to a few stores to get groceries, then took two extra walks just for fun, giving me a total distance travelled of 5 kilometer. It's late in the evening now, and while I would still like to smoke a ciggy before I go to bed in about two hours, I know I don't have to, and that feels good.

    Day 5, Monday the 18th: don't know much yet about tomorrow, only that I need to go to town again for something small, and I'll either ride my bike or walk. Thing I need is a button cell battery for my scales, because I wonder how much weight I'll lose if I take two walks a day and don't drink any alcohol for a while. That's another thing, I haven't had a drop of alcohol since the previous weekend, mostly because I was too afraid that I'd run to the store to buy tobacco, because when I drink my smokes taste better. I'm contemplating buying rum tomorrow evening and just suck on a pencil if I feel like smoking, or breathe in deeply and ignore the fact that there's no nicotine this time, because hey, if there's nothing there to taste "better", I don't miss it, right?

    I might keep you updated if there's any interest in my progression, but I can already tell that I feel much better, and I encourage every member to kick the habit, no matter if you smoke once a month or two packs a day. I was very suspicious about my odds going cold turkey, but I found out I have more willpower than I thought, and that feeling is awesome

    PS: if you quit cold turkey, expect to cough, gag, dry heave and puke a couple of times the first day, and spitting and blowing your nose a lot, that's just your body expelling the bad shit.
    Last edited by Resdayn; July 18, 2022 at 7:48 PM.
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  2. #2
    Senior Member mgtower's Avatar
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    Re: I quit smoking after 22 years

    I just did the math, I'm on day 11,070, I dubbed it March Madness 1992, No way am I going back!

    I salute you!

    KEEP ON TRUCKING!

    In the beginning, it only ate men, now it's coming for the women and children, and nothing can stop it.

  3. #3
    Senior Member MGTOWFOREVER's Avatar
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    Re: I quit smoking after 22 years

    Congrats to both of you. I quit smoking too. Do I miss it? Yes. But then I think of how much a pack costs and think screw that. I literally forget about it.
    Stay away from women. They will only break your heart.

  4. #4
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    Re: I quit smoking after 22 years

    Canadians told my pal cigs are $23 a pack up north now days. Said beer was a hundred a case though I have trouble believing that one.
    Last edited by frog; July 20, 2022 at 11:39 PM.
    Every day I make the world a little bit worse.

  5. #5
    Senior Member mgtower's Avatar
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    Re: I quit smoking after 22 years

    Quote Originally Posted by frog View Post
    Canadians told my pal cigs are $23 a pack up north now days. Said beer was a hundred a case though I have trouble believing that one.
    Connecticut broadleaf tobacco grows around here, and setting up a sour mash tank wouldn't be difficult, cha'ching!

    Two bags of groceries in 1962 cost $5.63

    https://youtu.be/5Gu8QFMlAg0?t=641
    In the beginning, it only ate men, now it's coming for the women and children, and nothing can stop it.

  6. #6
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    Re: I quit smoking after 22 years

    It would be fifty bucks today. Did you notice the cigarette rack above the clerks register?
    Every day I make the world a little bit worse.

  7. #7

    Re: I quit smoking after 22 years

    How r you doing mate? any update? GG!

  8. #8

    Re: I quit smoking after 22 years

    Awesome, OP. I'm mentally preparing to kick smoking too. Your quitting is inspiring me.
    I've quit a couple of times. The craving will diminish. Be only mentally prepared for the 6 weeks and 3 months marks. Those are the times the "demon" will start whispering: "see? You can keep off them. 1 won't hurt!" Don't give in: you'll be hooked in no time again.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Resdayn's Avatar
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    Re: I quit smoking after 22 years

    Quote Originally Posted by TrackingPanda View Post
    How r you doing mate? any update? GG!
    Still nicotine free, brother! Today is day 18, and while I expected to lose some weight because of me taking walks and riding around on my bike (I took a spontaneous 12km and a 11km ride last week), I gained about 2,5kg in weight. I've read that it is normal to gain a little weight after you quit smoking, but still... I wanna get rid of this pregnant belly, lol
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  10. #10
    Senior Member Resdayn's Avatar
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    Re: I quit smoking after 22 years

    Quote Originally Posted by RedPilledSimp View Post
    Awesome, OP. I'm mentally preparing to kick smoking too. Your quitting is inspiring me.
    I've quit a couple of times. The craving will diminish. Be only mentally prepared for the 6 weeks and 3 months marks. Those are the times the "demon" will start whispering: "see? You can keep off them. 1 won't hurt!" Don't give in: you'll be hooked in no time again.
    Awesome, bro, kick the habit!

    I know what you mean, Allen Carr made that very clear in his book. The demon WILL tell me that a single drag won't hurt, that I deserve it after not smoking for so long, and my answer will be "no I don't, so fuck off."
    Lord Nerevar Reborn

  11. #11
    Senior Member mgtower's Avatar
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    Re: I quit smoking after 22 years

    Quote Originally Posted by Resdayn View Post
    Still nicotine free, brother! Today is day 18, and while I expected to lose some weight because of me taking walks and riding around on my bike (I took a spontaneous 12km and a 11km ride last week), I gained about 2,5kg in weight. I've read that it is normal to gain a little weight after you quit smoking, but still... I wanna get rid of this pregnant belly, lol
    Now that your blood thinks it's supercharged with oxygen wouldn't that mean nutrient absorption, distribution, and burn be included in this equation? Wouldn't the nemesis be a plant getting more CO2 and putting on weight?

    With what you're saying I think any weight gain is from feeding your muscles the oxygen they need to burn the fuel.

    Personally I desire oxygen above 8,000 ft.. When skiing at 12,000 with unacclimated blood I feel like flat tire running on the rim.

    I cam up with the idea of pressurized lodging so us sea serpents could get a good night sleep, that or drop me down a mineshaft somewhere on the mountain, at least 4,000 thousand feet!

    At day 18 there's no legitimate reason to go back unless you give into the ever fading temptation. I hate the smell of tobacco, especially stale tobacco from a smokers home or car. Don't be surprised if or when you become hypersensitive to second hand smoke, especially when it's direct or thick smoke in a room, it'll have you heading for freshies the moment you enter.

    Back in the day I went on a cruise where they smoked in the dining area, the first night at dinner I saw a fog exiting the entry, but the fog was smoke thick enough to slice it! I got hit by it and ate topside at informal eateries. It's a night and day difference going on a cruse where smoking is prohibited, they have them because tobacco SMELLS LIKE SHIT!

    Many non smoking motels and hotels charge a lofty decontamination fee for smokers that ignore the restrictions, they have to clean the entire room, all the surfaces, linen, and run ozone generators. Smoking in a nonsmoking room can cost you a small fortune! That bill will show up on your credit card and fighting it is futile because it's in the fine print of your signed agreement.
    In the beginning, it only ate men, now it's coming for the women and children, and nothing can stop it.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Resdayn's Avatar
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    Re: I quit smoking after 22 years

    I don't know why I'm putting on weight, even if it's normal for people who quit smoking, but they usually start snacking more, or eating candy, or whatever sugary substance. I mean yeah, I drink rum 'n coke 3 nights a week and eat chips, nuts and cheese when I drink, but it's not different from when I smoked, so it's pretty retarded that way...
    Lord Nerevar Reborn

  13. #13

    Re: I quit smoking after 22 years

    Quote Originally Posted by Resdayn View Post
    I don't know why I'm putting on weight, even if it's normal for people who quit smoking, but they usually start snacking more, or eating candy, or whatever sugary substance. I mean yeah, I drink rum 'n coke 3 nights a week and eat chips, nuts and cheese when I drink, but it's not different from when I smoked, so it's pretty retarded that way...
    No it isn't. The metabolism of the cigarette ingredients a.k.a. the poison in them costs energy. Quitting smoking will lower your metabolism inadvertently. It's almost impossible not to gain weight after quitting. It'll take time and your metabolism will adapt. But it'll be some months. The quick win however is to drop the rumcoke/ nuts and cheese. That'll add to the gain weight. Also gaining some weight is the monumental lesser evil health wise over smoking. Furthermore the "oh, I'm gaining weight!" is also one of the "relapse demons" telling you "you can better start smoking again, or you'll look fat!" Like WTF? How would we care if we look fat? In this place!? If anything; it'd be a free thot repellent! Keep it up brother! You're really inspiring me for my attempt to kick that shit!

  14. #14

    Re: I quit smoking after 22 years

    Congrats, man. That's great news. You've done yourself a huge favor. I quit drinking back in 2010. The first week was definitely a bitch, but it got better after that. It keeps getting even better!

    Good for you, dude. It's a huge step toward a better life.

  15. #15
    Senior Member Resdayn's Avatar
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    Re: I quit smoking after 22 years

    Quote Originally Posted by RedPilledSimp View Post
    No it isn't. The metabolism of the cigarette ingredients a.k.a. the poison in them costs energy. Quitting smoking will lower your metabolism inadvertently. It's almost impossible not to gain weight after quitting. It'll take time and your metabolism will adapt. But it'll be some months. The quick win however is to drop the rumcoke/ nuts and cheese. That'll add to the gain weight. Also gaining some weight is the monumental lesser evil health wise over smoking. Furthermore the "oh, I'm gaining weight!" is also one of the "relapse demons" telling you "you can better start smoking again, or you'll look fat!" Like WTF? How would we care if we look fat? In this place!? If anything; it'd be a free thot repellent! Keep it up brother! You're really inspiring me for my attempt to kick that shit!
    Thanks for your reply, brother!

    I guess it ties in with me being skinny as fuck until I hit 30 (160-ish pounds @ 6'4", and now I'm closer to 240). Yes, drinking and snacking have definitely influenced my weight gain, but it's a shame yet also something that's apparently normal for men when we hit that age: we gain weight. I just wished that it was spread more evenly all over my body, but alas. The thing with drinking is that I know I don't need it, nor do I need the snacks, but it's just really chill to lean back in a chair and watch series or movies while getting drunk and stuffing myself.

    The evenings I don't drink, I don't miss alcohol at all. I can easily go a week without it, maybe two, but then I start longing for a night of fun, if you get me And I really hope you kick the habit too!
    Lord Nerevar Reborn

  16. #16

    Re: I quit smoking after 22 years

    Quote Originally Posted by Resdayn View Post

    The evenings I don't drink, I don't miss alcohol at all. I can easily go a week without it, maybe two, but then I start longing for a night of fun, if you get me And I really hope you kick the habit too!
    Thanks. In my case I have an alcohol problem, which I am kicking RN. Crossed the 2 year mark sober now. So now I'm mentally preparing for smoking. One problem at a time. I tried to kick both at once but that was very unsuccessful. In your case: careful with the booze. It'll impair your decision making and increasing the risk of smoking relapse. Especially on the 3 week, 6 weeks and 3 months marks. Those are the times you're at the biggest risk of relapse. Why? The "relapse demon" will start "whispering:" See, you have proven you can stay away from cigarettes. 1 won't hurt....

  17. #17
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    Re: I quit smoking after 22 years

    I was a heavy smoker in the past: I smoked 2 packs a day for 30 years. I tried quitting over and over, and failed every time. But I finally figured out a system for quitting that worked for me, using nicotine gum (Nicorette). So maybe it could work as "Plan B" for others. Just putting it out there, in case it might help others. I quit 20 years ago and haven't had a cigarette since then.

    In your typical cigarette, here’s how tar and nicotine work together:
    --Nicotine provides the addictive element and acts as a mild stimulant
    --Tar provides the taste/flavor and the harmful (cancer-causing) elements

    Take out the tars, and what you have left is nicotine: highly addictive, but otherwise a harmless mild stimulant.

    Also, people have different levels of addict-ability. With smoking, the theory is as follows: Nicotine is a mild stimulant. Some people are borderline depressed as part of their personality, and they use the stimulant effect of nicotine in their cigarettes to medicate themselves into a better mood, i.e., they use that nicotine boost to power them through the day. So those people are going to tend to be more heavily addicted. Take away their cigarettes, and they are going to continue to crave (feel the absence of) that helpful nicotine stimulant for weeks, months, or even years.

    By comparison, other people don’t specifically need the stimulant effect of the nicotine. Their mood is probably fine or at least it doesn't bounce around a whole lot. They’re just smoking for the taste, and they don’t necessarily get much from the stimulant boost. So they can quit relatively easily. Once they get over the hump on the nicotine addiction itself (about 3-5 days), they don’t particularly miss the nicotine boost. Effectively, they can take cigarettes or leave them.

    I was part of the first group: Kind of borderline depressed and deeply in need of a long-term stimulant boost. Whenever I tried to quit cigarettes, my mood would crash and I would feel like crap for weeks and months.

    One smoking-cessation strategy for the first group involves seeing a doctor and getting put on a mild anti-depressant so that the quitting smoker won't need the stimulant effect provided by the cigarettes. But then you have to play around with finding the best anti-depressant, dosing strategies, and how long to stay on the anti-depressant. A lot of people don’t want to do that; I didn’t.

    So to finally stop once and for all, I chewed huge amounts of nicotine gum (Nicorette) all day and even chewed it when I was going to sleep. Sometimes I was chewing five or six pieces of gum at a time. Again, nicotine is what gives you the mood boost, and it's the addictive portion of cigarettes. (Tars just provide flavor and screw up your lungs.) So I used the gum as a stimulant while quitting cigarettes.

    Furthermore, even after my last cigarette I kept on chewing nicotine gum for the next 5 years. I didn't want to stop the nicotine gum until cigarettes were so far back in my past that I couldn't even imagine picking up a cigarette again. It's now been 20 years since my last cigarette (and 15 years since my last piece of nicotine gum).

    When you chew nicotine gum, you get an immediate stimulant effect. It gives a noticeable boost like a little cup of coffee. As for me: It was great for getting off cigarettes. When I used it in place of cigarettes, I missed the flavor and the feel of smoking cigarettes, but my health improved instantly since I wasn’t clogging my lungs with tar. Meantime I didn’t experience any withdrawal symptoms from the lack of cigarettes since I could have all the nicotine I wanted via the gum.

    Five years later I was still perfectly healthy with the gum, but I knew that I really didn’t need such an expensive habit anymore. So I took about a year and weaned myself off the gum slowly. I chewed nicotine gums at specific times of the day, and then every few weeks I would knock out one gum-chewing session or substitute cinnamon gum for the nicotine gum.

    These days I’m still prone to chew on a toothpick occasionally. And cigarettes still smell good to me when I pass a smoker. Sometimes I just want to be near a lit cigarette and enjoy the scent and the memories. But cigarettes (and gum) just aren’t part of my self-picture anymore; I couldn’t seriously imagine picking a cigarette up and lighting it and returning to all the negative burdens that come with those things. (Also, my lungs took a lot of damage from 30 years of heavy smoking; I still feel some wheeziness down there. If I were to start smoking again, I know it would hit my lungs hard.)

    I also tried the nicotine patch for a while. But I thought it was a hassle to keep playing with those patches, and so the patch always ended in failure for me. The gum was easier. No matter how bad I was craving a smoke, I could take care of it by popping more gum into my mouth. Sometimes I was chewing five or six pieces of gum at a time. Whatever works.

    So in my case, I basically self-medicated with the nicotine gum and played around with the dosing of the nicotine stimulant myself. I used the nicotine gum and just let enough time go by to effectively “grow out of” the smoking habit. After a while I just didn’t see cigarettes as something I needed anymore.

    But the gum is kind of expensive, and the nicotine in the gum is still addictive. Like any addictive drug you have to wean yourself off it gradually if you decide that you're tired of paying for such a habit.

    So after five years of chewing the gum, I slowly tapered off the gum. Even that was kind of tough. But I wasn't tempted at all to smoke cigarettes during that time, and I haven't smoked since then.

    Of course, I'm not a doctor. So if you want to try the gum method yourself, do some research and use it safely. Don't make yourself sick by overdosing on nicotine or something.

    Anyway, best of luck on quitting!
    Last edited by MGTOWLife; August 4, 2022 at 1:42 PM.

  18. #18
    Senior Member Resdayn's Avatar
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    Re: I quit smoking after 22 years

    It's been a month now, and when people don't ask me about it, I don't even think about it. I did feel an urge to smoke a few days ago, but it went away pretty fast. Last night I dreamed that a friend came over and he offered me a cigarette. I hesitated but took it, then lit it and smoked it. I was really disappointed with myself during the dream and after I woke up, and it took me a good minute or two to realize that it was just a dream.
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    Re: I quit smoking after 22 years

    Quote Originally Posted by Resdayn View Post
    It's been a month now, and when people don't ask me about it, I don't even think about it. I did feel an urge to smoke a few days ago, but it went away pretty fast. Last night I dreamed that a friend came over and he offered me a cigarette. I hesitated but took it, then lit it and smoked it. I was really disappointed with myself during the dream and after I woke up, and it took me a good minute or two to realize that it was just a dream.
    It's been 28 years since I quit, and still the smoking dreams come up once in a while. Nicotine and all the associated habits have a powerful hold on the mind. As RedPilledSimp mentioned, you have to watch for the demon cravings that pop up after you think things are going smoothly and you're over the hurdle. Just when you let down your guard, the intense craving hits. "Surely, I can have just one cigarette and then go right back to abstinence." But give in, and the whole cycle starts again. I've heard claims the tobacco companies have engineered this in the chemical mix added to cigarettes to keep people addicted.

    A month without is a great accomplishment. I sure don't regret quitting, especially when I notice the latest price increases at the stores. It's $10 a pack here (in the US) with all the added taxes.

  20. #20
    Senior Member Resdayn's Avatar
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    Re: I quit smoking after 22 years

    Quote Originally Posted by BeenThereDoneThat View Post
    It's been 28 years since I quit, and still the smoking dreams come up once in a while. Nicotine and all the associated habits have a powerful hold on the mind. As RedPilledSimp mentioned, you have to watch for the demon cravings that pop up after you think things are going smoothly and you're over the hurdle. Just when you let down your guard, the intense craving hits. "Surely, I can have just one cigarette and then go right back to abstinence." But give in, and the whole cycle starts again. I've heard claims the tobacco companies have engineered this in the chemical mix added to cigarettes to keep people addicted.

    A month without is a great accomplishment. I sure don't regret quitting, especially when I notice the latest price increases at the stores. It's $10 a pack here (in the US) with all the added taxes.
    Yes, yesterday evening (so a few hours after my post), I was standing on my balcony and craving a cigarette once again. I defeated it by breathing deeply and thinking "no!" to that insidious demon, and it shut the fuck up.

    10 bucks a pack? Hah, that's cheap compared to here. Here you pay 15 bucks for a 20-pack of ciggies, or 50 grams of tobacco, and ze gubmint wants to increase prices to 40 bucks in 2030... so what will you get? People who are going to steal cigs, or drive to Luxembourg to buy in bulk (and hide the tobacco from customs, or patrol cars. Or they'll try and grow their own shit. Or they'll just keep paying and go completely broke, forcing them to steal instead.

    They (gubmint) don't give a shit about health, they want to cash in as much as possible because they know people WILL continue smoking. When I hit my teens, a pack of cigs cost Fl. 5,25 (Gulden, or "Dutch Florin"), and when we got close to the introduction of the Euro, it cost Fl. 7,50. Everyone shrugged because it was still cheap. We naively expected the Euro price to be around € 3,40-ish since € 1 = Fl. 2,20, but nope, they made it € 7,50. Twenty years later and the price has doubled "because of muh inflation!", and though I did spend a shitload on tobacco, I'm glad that I quit at the price of € 15,50, I'd hate to be a guy who pays € 40 for cigs!
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