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  1. #1

    Men dropping out of the workforce: Over 30 million American men aren't "working"

    https://finance.yahoo.com/news/7-ways-men-live-without-working-in-america-092147068.html

    "I’m not talking about why men have lost their jobs — factories closing, layoffs, automation, outsourcing jobs overseas, even perhaps women entering the workforce, (in fact, the participation rate by women over the same time period is way up)."

    Let them have it.

    I guess one could say this is the American version of the "lying flat" movement in China. Some of reasons cited for the continued drop in number are ridiculous in my opinion but still made for an interesting article. Just another symptom, another crack, in the giant rock of the American empire. On the bright side I'm glad more men are slowly shedding the ego...embracing the minimalist lifestyle, going their own way.

  2. #2
    Senior Member mgtower's Avatar
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    Re: Men dropping out of the workforce: Over 30 million American men aren't "working"

    I don't live "in" America, I live "on" America. There's a difference when you're a lawfully disenfranchised voter placed under CEASE AND DESIST from lawful activity. Criminalized.

    America has become everything it swore not to be.

  3. #3

    Re: Men dropping out of the workforce: Over 30 million American men aren't "working"

    I wouldn't mind losing my job and going on EI again, short time I was on that during Covid I was getting 20-30% less per month but it wasn't that bad since no work was actually required.
    Majority of men never actually see their taxes come back to them in anyway - like +90% or the majority of men being net tax payers, don't remember the exact stat but it's the complete and total opposite for women being the recipients of tax dollars that almost never pay in what they consume from the welfare state.

    Know a guy at a previous job that just did 6 month contracts so that he could get full EI benefits and apply for another contract job once that was up - will probably go a similar route once I've got some more dough saved up but not fully retired. With the min-wage Americans, they receive more in unemployment benefits than their actual fucking minimum wage jobs, which is quite the conundrum for companies and small business that can't find workers to slave away anymore lol.

  4. #4

    Re: Men dropping out of the workforce: Over 30 million American men aren't "working"

    Quote Originally Posted by JustWannaRetireFk View Post
    I wouldn't mind losing my job and going on EI again, short time I was on that during Covid I was getting 20-30% less per month but it wasn't that bad since no work was actually required.
    Majority of men never actually see their taxes come back to them in anyway - like +90% or the majority of men being net tax payers, don't remember the exact stat but it's the complete and total opposite for women being the recipients of tax dollars that almost never pay in what they consume from the welfare state.

    Know a guy at a previous job that just did 6 month contracts so that he could get full EI benefits and apply for another contract job once that was up - will probably go a similar route once I've got some more dough saved up but not fully retired. With the min-wage Americans, they receive more in unemployment benefits than their actual fucking minimum wage jobs, which is quite the conundrum for companies and small business that can't find workers to slave away anymore lol.
    I was on unemployment since March of 2020 until now. I was laid off from my hotel job. Regardless, I start my job at Amazon in two weeks.

    However, I enjoyed that extra $600 and $300 Federal benefits. It paid me more than my hotel job. I enjoyed the hell out of that money. Not splurging, but investing in my passion.
    "Courage is the catalyst that manifest ambitions." - Transcendent Sacred Courage

  5. #5

    Re: Men dropping out of the workforce: Over 30 million American men aren't "working"

    Quote Originally Posted by McDudeski McGee View Post
    Working hard only makes sense if others depend on you. Without obligations, easy mode is always the best choice.

    Personal responsibility, freedom, rights both human and individual -- that's all provider talk. If you're mooching off the Rainbow Empire, more power to you. Tax the women, tax Mr. Big, and relax. We should be directing gibs in our direction. Rather than the geriatric capitalism versus socialism foodfights of the Cold War, ask if X helps you. If it does then it is good, if it doesn't, then it isn't.

    Too many people get caught up in saving civilization, as if we're facing a collective shit test we must pass. But we've already taken the loss; this is a feminist world and we're just living in it. It makes no sense to put group above self when women have dissolved all group identities -- family, culture, religion, nation, ethnicity, and race -- to create a borderless consumerist world where everything is an easily discarded "option." We keep fighting for the ghost of the past, as if we're trying to keep a boat afloat after it has been shipwrecked. Better to grab what we want from the wreckage instead.
    Much agreed. Like Bruce Lee said: "Be like water. Use what is useful. Discard what is not."
    "Courage is the catalyst that manifest ambitions." - Transcendent Sacred Courage

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    Re: Men dropping out of the workforce: Over 30 million American men aren't "working"

    We really don't need as much in life as society and the media like us to believe we do. Life can be very cheap if we allow it to be. Also, who says these men aren't working? Maybe not as the Taxman knows but there is a huge market out there for cash in hand jobs. There was also a bit in that article about men living off the land and the author claims proof via the increase in the amount of fishing licences being registered?! I don't know about you guys but if I wasn't earning any money and living off the land/living somewhere remote than I don't think I would bother with licences let alone want to spend what little money I had on them.

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    Re: Men dropping out of the workforce: Over 30 million American men aren't "working"

    I think i deleted trying to edit. Good greif.

    https://cdn.discordapp.com/attachmen...5to34share.gif

    This is a graph i made several years ago. It is clalculated by taking the median hourly wages by gender and then dividing by the gdp per hour, to get a rough estimation of what percent of your own work you are being paid.

    Since the arrival of women into the labor msrket men have watched half their income disappear. If i am getting paid half as much money, why would i not be half as interested in working?

    This issue is why i loudly and vocally support UBI (universal basic income). Make working entirely optional, watch a bunch of underpaid and overworked men quit, and watch women suddenly realize that either they work the job or he works the job, but there's only room for one.

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    Re: Men dropping out of the workforce: Over 30 million American men aren't "working"

    Quote Originally Posted by Vulgmarx View Post
    I think i deleted trying to edit. Good greif.

    https://cdn.discordapp.com/attachmen...5to34share.gif

    This is a graph i made several years ago. It is clalculated by taking the median hourly wages by gender and then dividing by the gdp per hour, to get a rough estimation of what percent of your own work you are being paid.

    Since the arrival of women into the labor msrket men have watched half their income disappear. If i am getting paid half as much money, why would i not be half as interested in working?

    This issue is why i loudly and vocally support UBI (universal basic income). Make working entirely optional, watch a bunch of underpaid and overworked men quit, and watch women suddenly realize that either they work the job or he works the job, but there's only room for one.
    It is never lost on me that 40 plus years ago a man could support his family on his pay alone. He didn't have to be a high flyer to do it either just regular job. People tended to have more kids back then too.

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    Re: Men dropping out of the workforce: Over 30 million American men aren't "working"

    Quote Originally Posted by Kryptic View Post
    It is never lost on me that 40 plus years ago a man could support his family on his pay alone. He didn't have to be a high flyer to do it either just regular job. People tended to have more kids back then too.
    I think about that, too.

    My dad was Airman First Class in the Air Force (three stripes) and supported a housewife and six kids. House was 3BR 1 BA, 828 sf. In 1959, our house cost $10,000.00. Imagine all eight of us in that dinky house. 3 boys in one BR, three girls in another. I've seen modern walk-in closets the size of the boys bedroom. Trundle beds and bunk beds were our way of life.

    We just went to school, came home, what's for dinner Mom, then did our homework, watched TV in the living room, played board games at the kitchen table, went to bed. Played in the yard a lot. Rode our bikes a lot.

    Travel to Disneyland? It never came up. Sunday nights on TV, you bet. It was many years later that I discovered that families actually traveled across state lines to go on vacation to places like Disneyland. Really? People do that? I'd only known the vicinity of wherever we lived.

    As the AF transferred us around to different assignments, our houses always were 3 bedroom, 1 bath rentals. Linoleum tile floors. Never carpeting. Carpeting was a luxury gift on TV game shows like Concentration or Let's Make A Deal. They advertised it as wall-to-wall carpeting, such a huge deal it was, too. Nobody says "wall-to-wall carpeting" anymore. It's a standard feature nowadays, as we know.

    By the time we ended up at our last assignment in 1970, we had shaken off a few kids. My folks bought a house there, an older home, 5BR 1.25 BA for $12,500.00. Actually, it was a 2 BR but my folks slept in the parlor with its French doors and the basement was cordoned off to make two more bedrooms, near the exposed pull-chain toilet. Monthly house payment was $100.00. They sold it in 1976 for $37,000.00. While there, my dad did take a second night job as a projectionist at the base theater but I never learned if it was for need or pleasure, as Dad was four stripes by then and we were three kids lighter.

    I mention these prices to help give an idea of how a single income could do it. Not much to go on, I realize.

    Growing up, the folks hauled all of us to the grocery store and we kids sat in the car while they shopped. Other families did this, I would notice, and one time us and another car-full of kids got into some back-and-forth name-calling from about 7 parking stalls away. I don't notice this anymore, where kids are left in the car. Maybe it still goes on.

    We grew up with only one car, a used station wagon, traded in for another used station wagon. Dad took the car to work so everyone else had no wheels until he came home. But we didn't do extracurricular school activities. Occasionally, Mom might take him to work so she could have the car. In 1972, Dad bought new an International Harvester Scout II. Wow, we were now a two-car family. Maybe that's why the second job.

    Stores had the Lay-Away Plan where you would pick out from the shelf an item that you could not pay for all at once, walk it over to the Lay-Away counter, and someone would store it in a large back room with your name on it. You could make monthly payments, I think no carrying charges, and only when you finally paid it off would they hand you the item so that you could take it home. You don't see the Lay-Away Plan anymore, everybody uses credit cards, although a few years ago I saw it offered online somewhere. But, yeah, Lay-Away was a fact of life. I got it on Lay-Away, you'd say, while you were making payments. Ask your parents or grandparents about this.

    Sometime in the 70s there was a national real estate escalation of sorts, or I am imagining this? I know that the oil embargo of 1979 said bye-bye to the low gas prices of my youth. I was a car driver before, during, and after this embargo but was not a home owner. Perhaps this was when home prices joined the fun.

    I've read that the 70s were the Golden Age for labor unions and yeah we had good contracts compared to what came later. So, maybe a lot of boats were rising with the tide during this time.

    Wikipedia says Beginning in the 1970s women began to flood colleges and grad schools.

    I've had the layman's theory that, as women joined the workforce, creating two-income families, the (housing) market adjusted itself upward to access that extra income, while at the same time families increasingly lamented that gee it takes two incomes to do what only one income used to do. Well, yeah, they saw ya coming, amirite? When couples go to buy a home, don't they first see how much home they can qualify to buy, and doesn't that involve adding together both incomes and showing this to the bank and the realtor who will steer you to your purchase? Well, there ya go, upward pressure on the market, yes?

    My point being, the market adjusted itself from putting the squeeze on a single income to putting the squeeze on two incomes. The market found the new squeeze line and moved itself to there.

    Someone who knows more or has a better memory could probably correct me on any of this.
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  10. #10
    Senior Member mgtower's Avatar
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    Re: Men dropping out of the workforce: Over 30 million American men aren't "working"

    Quote Originally Posted by Unboxxed View Post
    I think about that, too.

    My dad was Airman First Class in the Air Force (three stripes) and supported a housewife and six kids. House was 3BR 1 BA, 828 sf. In 1959, our house cost $10,000.00. Imagine all eight of us in that dinky house. 3 boys in one BR, three girls in another. I've seen modern walk-in closets the size of the boys bedroom. Trundle beds and bunk beds were our way of life.

    We just went to school, came home, what's for dinner Mom, then did our homework, watched TV in the living room, played board games at the kitchen table, went to bed. Played in the yard a lot. Rode our bikes a lot.

    Travel to Disneyland? It never came up. Sunday nights on TV, you bet. It was many years later that I discovered that families actually traveled across state lines to go on vacation to places like Disneyland. Really? People do that? I'd only known the vicinity of wherever we lived.

    As the AF transferred us around to different assignments, our houses always were 3 bedroom, 1 bath rentals. Linoleum tile floors. Never carpeting. Carpeting was a luxury gift on TV game shows like Concentration or Let's Make A Deal. They advertised it as wall-to-wall carpeting, such a huge deal it was, too. Nobody says "wall-to-wall carpeting" anymore. It's a standard feature nowadays, as we know.

    By the time we ended up at our last assignment in 1970, we had shaken off a few kids. My folks bought a house there, an older home, 5BR 1.25 BA for $12,500.00. Actually, it was a 2 BR but my folks slept in the parlor with its French doorsand the basement was cordoned off to make two more bedrooms, near the exposed pull-chain toilet. Monthly house payment was $100.00. They sold it in 1976 for $37,000.00. While there, my dad did take a second night job as a projectionist at the base theater but I never learned if it was for need or pleasure, as Dad was four stripes by then and we were three kids lighter.

    I mention these prices to help give an idea of how a single income could do it. Not much to go on, I realize.

    Growing up, the folks hauled all of us to the grocery store and we kids sat in the car while they shopped. Other families did this, I would notice, and one time us and another car-full of kids got into some back-and-forth name-calling from about 7 parking stalls away. I don't notice this anymore, where kids are left in the car. Maybe it still goes on.

    We grew up with only one car, a used station wagon, traded in for another used station wagon. Dad took the car to work so everyone else had no wheels until he came home. But we didn't do extracurricular school activities. Occasionally, Mom might take him to work so she could have the car. In 1972, Dad bought new an International Harvester Scout II. Wow, we were now a two-car family. Maybe that's why the second job.

    Stores had the Lay-Away Plan where you would pick out from the shelf an item that you could not pay for all at once, walk it over to the Lay-Away counter, and someone would store it in a large back room with your name on it. You could make monthly payments, I think no carrying charges, and only when you finally paid it off would they hand you the item so that you could take it home. You don't see the Lay-Away Plan anymore, everybody uses credit cards, although a few years ago I saw it offered online somewhere. But, yeah, Lay-Away was a fact of life. I got it on Lay-Away, you'd say, while you were making payments. Ask your parents or grandparents about this.

    Sometime in the 70s there was a national real estate escalation of sorts, or I am imagining this? I know that the oil embargo of 1979 said bye-bye to the low gas prices of my youth. I was a car driver before, during, and after this embargo but was not a home owner. Perhaps this was when home prices joined the fun.

    I've read that the 70s were the Golden Age for labor unions and yeah we had good contracts compared to what came later. So, maybe a lot of boats were rising with the tide during this time.

    Wikipedia says Beginning in the 1970s women began to flood colleges and grad schools.

    I've had the layman's theory that, as women joined the workforce, creating two-income families, the (housing) market adjusted itself upward to access that extra income, while at the same time families increasingly lamented that gee it takes two incomes to do what only one income used to do. Well, yeah, they saw ya coming, amirite? When couples go to buy a home, don't they first see how much home they can qualify to buy, and doesn't that involve adding together both incomes and showing this to the bank and the realtor who will steer you to your purchase? Well, there ya go, upward pressure on the market, yes?

    My point being, the market adjusted itself from putting the squeeze on a single income to putting the squeeze on two incomes. The market found the new squeeze line and moved itself to there.

    Someone who knows more or has a better memory could probably correct me on any of this.
    You want a real eye opener?

    My buddy just purchased north western cedar shakes, $500 A BOX! It's costing him more to finish his house than it costed to buy a house in the 60s!

    10'x10' (one square/3 boxes) $1,500 X 8 = $12,000

    What caused this?

    Ink, lots of red ink and the ability to print money with that ink. But don't you do it, you'll be jailed for fraud. What does that make the people that do print money? I'll let you answer that question...

    Not holding people to account will be the demise and utter ruination of this nation. Justice is now self serve or none at all.
    Last edited by mgtower; September 26, 2021 at 11:42 AM.

  11. #11

    Re: Men dropping out of the workforce: Over 30 million American men aren't "working"

    "The Earth can provide for every man's need, but not every man's greed."
    -- Author Unknown to Me

  12. #12

    Re: Men dropping out of the workforce: Over 30 million American men aren't "working"

    Quote Originally Posted by mgtower View Post
    I don't live "in" America, I live "on" America. There's a difference when you're a lawfully disenfranchised voter placed under CEASE AND DESIST from lawful activity. Criminalized.

    America has become everything it swore not to be.
    Good God! I could not agree more. I've said this on more than one occasion, "this is not my country anymore so I see no reason to invest in it." Is it any wonder that men would opt out of work? When 27% of your income is stolen from you before you see it, why shouldn't you take back 27% of your time?
    In the future there will be robots.

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    Senior Member mgtower's Avatar
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    Re: Men dropping out of the workforce: Over 30 million American men aren't "working"

    Quote Originally Posted by Bonobo Protocol View Post
    Good God! I could not agree more. I've said this on more than one occasion, "this is not my country anymore so I see no reason to invest in it." Is it any wonder that men would opt out of work? When 27% of your income is stolen from you before you see it, why shouldn't you take back 27% of your time?
    At first it's a feeling you get in the pit of your stomach, then one day it strikes you, no more feelings, they lead you to the facts and there's no going back to bullshittsville USA, where they choke on the smog of deception calling it clean air because that's what they were told.

    For some it's a shining city on a hill, while for others it's a dark smog laced valley smothered in corruption. I don't make up the facts, they make up themselves and they're indisputable. Freedom has taken its last breath long ago in a promise scoured away.

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    Re: Men dropping out of the workforce: Over 30 million American men aren't "working"

    I've been in my current role for 21 years now, yep, the whole century. That is fine I do like the stability. I have held higher positions but have always demoted myself or if a short term role never stepped up for a promotion again. I get offered promotions a fair bit. After 21 years, the place started to change drastically about a year or so ago. We are contractors but were always treated like part of the family, that stopped when virtually the entire management changed.

    Policies changed, procedures etc. After 21 years I am more nervous in the place now than I was when I started. Could I have done better somewhere else? Should I have left a long time ago? Possibly.

    Anyway, my point in regards to this thread is that work is no longer an investment. If you work for someone else than you are just renting your time and that is it. Ever heard the stories of the old timer who retires after 50 years with the same company and gets a gold watch? That in itself sucks but you don't even get that now. People and especially men have changed, a lot of us no longer are willing to throw ourselves against the wall taking the beatings for the sake of the company or society. We no longer have families or kids to support, some of us never had them at all.

    Society has become more selfish and men have had their own awakening.

  15. #15

    Re: Men dropping out of the workforce: Over 30 million American men aren't "working"

    Quote Originally Posted by Kryptic View Post
    It is never lost on me that 40 plus years ago a man could support his family on his pay alone. He didn't have to be a high flyer to do it either just regular job. People tended to have more kids back then too.
    Yes, I agree. Times have changed. I grew up on a farm, we had beef cattle and small amount of chickens for a while. There was a large garden where mandatory time was spent planting, weeding, and harvesting. All the vegies were grown for year round use. Most of the fruit was home grown also except the citrus, that was very limited. When we did get citrus, the rinds were saved and made into marmalade, not much went to waste. The house was heated with wood all cut from off the farm.

    I was the youngest of 3 boys, a lot of my cloths were hand-me-downs. My mother knew how to somewhat sow, she made a lot of her own dresses and mended/patched up what she could. Not much went to waste.

    I was about 9 or 10, and thought that I wanted a bicycle. I asked and the reply was: "You want it, you better earn the money to buy it". Up the road I went asking to cut lawns for money. The start of my working career...

    What has changed: It's now a disposable income and economy. The women go shopping for something to do, not because they have to. Why grow your own food when you can just buy it? The loss of skills for both men and women to make/repair your own consumables/food. One of the biggest is the card, be it a debit or a credit card. When I count out money to buy something, that is my time/work I am counting, the swipe of the card is the same for a coffee & donut or a $30K purchase. I look at my local classifieds, see used items for sale that are "Hardly used" or "Selling due to upgrade". What you didn't think it threw enough to buy the right product in the first place? Now you are selling it off at half price to get some money back to make the payment on the CC that you used to buy it in the first place....

    It's a totally different way of living now... Buy now and pay later.

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    Re: Men dropping out of the workforce: Over 30 million American men aren't "working"

    Quote Originally Posted by RustyNuts View Post
    Yes, I agree. Times have changed. I grew up on a farm, we had beef cattle and small amount of chickens for a while. There was a large garden where mandatory time was spent planting, weeding, and harvesting. All the vegies were grown for year round use. Most of the fruit was home grown also except the citrus, that was very limited. When we did get citrus, the rinds were saved and made into marmalade, not much went to waste. The house was heated with wood all cut from off the farm.

    I was the youngest of 3 boys, a lot of my cloths were hand-me-downs. My mother knew how to somewhat sow, she made a lot of her own dresses and mended/patched up what she could. Not much went to waste.

    I was about 9 or 10, and thought that I wanted a bicycle. I asked and the reply was: "You want it, you better earn the money to buy it". Up the road I went asking to cut lawns for money. The start of my working career...

    What has changed: It's now a disposable income and economy. The women go shopping for something to do, not because they have to. Why grow your own food when you can just buy it? The loss of skills for both men and women to make/repair your own consumables/food. One of the biggest is the card, be it a debit or a credit card. When I count out money to buy something, that is my time/work I am counting, the swipe of the card is the same for a coffee & donut or a $30K purchase. I look at my local classifieds, see used items for sale that are "Hardly used" or "Selling due to upgrade". What you didn't think it threw enough to buy the right product in the first place? Now you are selling it off at half price to get some money back to make the payment on the CC that you used to buy it in the first place....

    It's a totally different way of living now... Buy now and pay later.
    Exactly. We now have Designer/Boutique clothes for babies and toddlers!! I have never had kids but I know they grow fast and the idea of spending big on boutique clothing for them is ridiculous. In the past as you mention clothes were all hand me downs and if bought new they were basic fare.

    I was born in the early 70's and my grandparents and father were in Europe during WW2. Things like wasting food was a cardinal sin in my family. My mother was more flippant though but she was born after the war. Money back then was also seen as very important whereas now it something people just make so they can spend. I see queues of people lining up to get coffee every morning at the local drive thru's, a cup of coffee here is around $4-5 and that is just basic stuff. Every morning these people queue up to get coffee on their way to work. I work with people who spend $5-15 a day on coffee alone. That adds up.

    Growing your own food tastes so much better as well then store bought which is usually quite bland.

    And again yes. I work with people who upgrade phones, computers, tablets etc every time a new one comes out. I just recently replaced my Apple I4S because it was getting impossible to do some things I wanted and needed to do. I am typing this on a lap top that is over 10 years old and until it can no longer be used at all, I will keep it.

    Thinking back to the comment made by @Unboxxed as well, as mentioned I was born in the early 70's and in Australia but I think the culture is similar enough to America to compare. When I was a kid, there was a greater sense of community. People weren't as keen to try and gouge each other for money. Things were cheaper in general. And there was less you thought you had to have. We didn't have Pay TV here till the early 90's. The internet didn't exist so that was another saving. No cell phones, additional savings. A lot of the time when the wife does work the kids go into child care now so that is another cost, makes you wonder how many people are working just to have shit they don't need.

    And I think that is a huge difference between then and now. We work harder to buy more crap.

    Housing is more expensive as well because we have had Governments kow tow to China which is now biting us on the arse big time. And we now have Property Developers who tack on fees which make properties and houses more expensive as well. It's an on going saga of self destruction.

  17. #17

    Re: Men dropping out of the workforce: Over 30 million American men aren't "working"

    Quote Originally Posted by Kryptic View Post
    We really don't need as much in life as society and the media like us to believe we do. Life can be very cheap if we allow it to be.
    Ain't that the truth. I'm constantly barraged with the question whether I'm going to go back to school and do my Psych NP. It's getting annoying as I'm tired of repeating myself. I make enough money, I have savings, and I'm financially stable in enough to not have to work overtime. What would be the point of going back to school other than to make more money. Time over money any day. I cannot bare the thought of wasting more years in school burning time in order to make more money.

  18. #18
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    Re: Men dropping out of the workforce: Over 30 million American men aren't "working"

    Quote Originally Posted by Hedon View Post
    Ain't that the truth. I'm constantly barraged with the question whether I'm going to go back to school and do my Psych NP. It's getting annoying as I'm tired of repeating myself. I make enough money, I have savings, and I'm financially stable in enough to not have to work overtime. What would be the point of going back to school other than to make more money. Time over money any day. I cannot bare the thought of wasting more years in school burning time in order to make more money.
    Time and money spent on education vs just doing your job and making money now. Eventually you might make more with the Psych NP but is it worth it? I know plenty of people with degrees etc and they are working basic jobs for various reasons. Still paying off student loans and course fees. I might be a dummy but I am a debt free dummy.

  19. #19

    Re: Men dropping out of the workforce: Over 30 million American men aren't "working"

    Quote Originally Posted by McDudeski McGee View Post
    Working hard only makes sense if others depend on you. Without obligations, easy mode is always the best choice.
    Exactly. I've turned down promotions to stay in a decently paid, relatively stress free promotion. The way our pay scales work, if I took a promotion I'd actually take a hit in pay for a year or two, before finally and marginally making more money. In the meantime, my stress levels would skyrocket and the expectations would be much higher. I'd also be expected to be more a of a team player and join in on what I like to call "organized fun"- the stupid happy hours, weekend hangouts, etc. To me a job is a job and when I walk out of there, I don't want to think about it anymore. They get their 40 hrs a week out of me and that's more than enough.

  20. #20

    Re: Men dropping out of the workforce: Over 30 million American men aren't "working"

    We want the simple life. Now the female has absolved us of our duty as provider we are free to pursue the spiritual path. We recognise that the materialist capitalist model is flawed, as is the socialist model. We seek the third way. Simplicity - in a semi Diogenes type way that only can truly be achieved in a more complex society. We are afforded this opportunity.


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