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  1. #1
    Member FireBird's Avatar
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    Any of you know anything about complex post-traumatic stress disorder?

    Okay so I made a post on .win about my parents arguing which I also did on this forum and this one user mentioned something about Complex post-traumatic stress disorder on .win?



    The thing is though I've been in situations where people yelled at each other but I never left the area or room I was. However, in school I sometimes did ask to go to the bathroom in school when it did get too loud but I don't think it was severe enough to be noticeable. I'm not asking the question in the title because I want people to feel sorry for me or to be awarded victimhood points. All I want to know is what's up with this so called complex PTSD because I never heard of that in my life. I did a little research on it but I didn't manage to get too much info on it. I don't know if that has to do with the reason I'd been always putting headphones on when my parents ever so get slightly loud and at one point had to leave the house last week due to the arguing to prevent myself from going insane.
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  2. #2

    Re: Any of you know anything about complex post-traumatic stress disorder?

    Quote Originally Posted by FireBird View Post
    Okay so I made a post on .win about my parents arguing which I also did on this forum and this one user mentioned something about Complex post-traumatic stress disorder on .win?



    The thing is though I've been in situations where people yelled at each other but I never left the area or room I was. However, in school I sometimes did ask to go to the bathroom in school when it did get too loud but I don't think it was severe enough to be noticeable. I'm not asking the question in the title because I want people to feel sorry for me or to be awarded victimhood points. All I want to know is what's up with this so called complex PTSD because I never heard of that in my life. I did a little research on it but I didn't manage to get too much info on it. I don't know if that has to do with the reason I'd been always putting headphones on when my parents ever so get slightly loud and at one point had to leave the house last week due to the arguing to prevent myself from going insane.
    I’ve read that shrooms are great for PTSD.

  3. #3
    Administrator Unboxxed's Avatar
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    Re: Any of you know anything about complex post-traumatic stress disorder?

    I know that too many people misuse that medical term to describe how they feel. It's a condition that is diagnosed by a professional but is used loosely by your average person to where I don't think much when I see it used by someone who is expecting me to take it seriously.
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  4. #4
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    Re: Any of you know anything about complex post-traumatic stress disorder?

    As a veteran, I understand that PTSD comes from constant, repeated exposure to situation of extreme stress. (Combat on a 24-hour daily basis, continual beatings, consistently unpredictably violent situations, etc.).

    Most US civilians have yet to be exposed to such highly volatile (and stressful) situations.

  5. #5

    Re: Any of you know anything about complex post-traumatic stress disorder?

    All I know about it is that this is a classic soldier's desease. A situation where someone gets an overdosis of brain stimuli and there can also be flashbacks as far as I know. "Complex" probably means that there is another desease linked with the original PTSD, which can vary.
    "One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them,
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  6. #6

    Re: Any of you know anything about complex post-traumatic stress disorder?

    Only youngsters i have ever known to have PTSD were those child soldiers i came across in Saharan Africa. 12 years and up, high on drugs,decapitating babies, lopping off limbs, locking entire families in huts and setting them alight. Come cease fire, those kids were screwed. Doubt they will ever be able to integrate into "normal" society.

    You dont have PTSD...you simply dont like screaming and shouting,noise and BS. Dont let anyone tell you otherwise and allow them to pump you full of mind altering drugs!! Avoid getting involved in drama( which i see you already do).This is a good thing for your sanity, and as you mature you will learn how not to put yourself in such situations , avoid it,where you can, and your life will be, for the most part, free from stress. This often takes men a lifetime to learn. Control your own life. Keep your sanity. Dont buy into popular hype, make up your own mind on issues that concern you based on the evidence before you, not on what social media, or talking heads with their own agenda tell you.Remember, your mind is a beautiful thing, your only true friend and life partner and yours and yours alone.

    Choose your career wisely. Corporate worlds now are TOXIC. Work out a balance between money and need.There are jobs where just yourself/yr small crew can work uninterrupted. I spent many years working for a NGO, travelling the world, seeing how nasty man can be to his fellows, and at the end of it all i wanted to do was shoot all those jabbering , insane idiots i had to work with!( and myself) Should have been a plumber instead! Then ,least the shit i work with cant talk shit to me!!

  7. #7
    Senior Member mgtower's Avatar
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    Re: Any of you know anything about complex post-traumatic stress disorder?

    PTSD comes from violence and extended mental torture to which I've endured both, and yes, it doesn't go away. A bird flying in from my blind spot can trigger it, a flash of light, a bang, anything sudden and unexpected can trigger it. It fucks my day up when it happens to the point I must gather my thoughts and regroup, usually with my back covered or in a room I can reprogram to normal again. Because of it, I can't go long with my back exposed, I have to see everything around me as if leopards and lions lay and wait for an attack, in my mind it's a matter expecting an attack and severe beating or death.

    I guess it's a matter of the flight-or-fight trigger being jammed in the on position and never turns off. As far as it causing one to be a people pleaser to appease it, no, I can be pretty damn violent when need be. I envy people that never endured violence or public persecution with legal threats of fines and imprisonment by the corrupt and all powerful.
    Corruption, like low tide, lowers all boats and smashes their hulls on the rocks.

  8. #8

    Re: Any of you know anything about complex post-traumatic stress disorder?

    I couldn't wait to get away from my parent's crazy. My sister's crazy wasn't any better. Unfortunately, I ended up leaving their crazy for a new crazy with someone else. There's a lot of crazy out there. Once I figured things out however, which wasn't until I turned 45, which is when I learned of the MGTOW mindset, which saved me from making the same mistake over and over - expecting a different result, I decided to live on my own.

    I hope you can move up and get a place of your own. A place of your own can be a small slice of heaven. My home is my space where, 99.999% of the time, no one can harm me but me.

    For me, living alone isn't perfect and can certainly have its downsides, but the grass isn't greener on the other side, which I also learned the hard way.

    Until you get a place of your own, you will continue to suffer at the hands of others. I've never seen it work any other way.
    Sex is the bait. Marriage is the trap. Divorce rape is the goal.

  9. #9
    Senior Member mgtower's Avatar
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    Re: Any of you know anything about complex post-traumatic stress disorder?

    Quote Originally Posted by MannSplainer View Post
    I couldn't wait to get away from my parent's crazy. My sister's crazy wasn't any better. Unfortunately, I ended up leaving their crazy for a new crazy with someone else. There's a lot of crazy out there. Once I figured things out however, which wasn't until I turned 45, which is when I learned of the MGTOW mindset, which saved me from making the same mistake over and over - expecting a different result, I decided to live on my own.

    I hope you can move up and get a place of your own. A place of your own can be a small slice of heaven. My home is my space where, 99.999% of the time, no one can harm me but me.

    For me, living alone isn't perfect and can certainly have its downsides, but the grass isn't greener on the other side, which I also learned the hard way.

    Until you get a place of your own, you will continue to suffer at the hands of others. I've never seen it work any other way.
    My only worry on my own is medical, some of the shit I do can be very dangerous. Material safety data sheets and SOP's (standard operating procedures) won't save me after the fact, everything I do has to be done with extra caution and I have 1st aid kits and basic knowhow to use them, but that won't help me if I'm torn in two, crushed, blown up, dead and smoldering! My biggest fear is personal injury, beyond that, the peace and tranquility is breathtaking! Many years ago, I drove myself to the emergency room late at night while going in shock from an injury, now that the hospital is closed, the drive is 10 times further! You can keep your doctor but not your hospital!

    The rust belt saga continues and spreads with another brutal round of economic strangulation, starvation, and stagnation via excessive taxation and what amounts to executive negligence!
    Batshit crazy is behind the wheel! WTF?
    Corruption, like low tide, lowers all boats and smashes their hulls on the rocks.

  10. #10
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    Re: Any of you know anything about complex post-traumatic stress disorder?

    It's a term that gets used a lot, mostly by people who don't really have it or know much about it. I've known two guys who had it for sure, my father, a prison camp survivor and a Vietnam vet. PTSD is not uncommon among vets, so I reckon there's more, but these two I'm sure about.

    How soldiers usually get it, is something awful happens and the huge adrenaline rush that comes with the unpleasantness burn's the memory into their brain. It never goes away, and for the rest of their life it still seems like yesterday to them. I suppose one event could do it, though for most it accumulates from all the bad shit they endured.

    My guess is the big adrenaline rush they can't put behind them is why they never heal, and that's why I don't think you have PTSD. You are however, completely fed up with your parents fighting all the time, and I don't think there's anything wrong with that. I think you have common sense, not PTSD. Too bad housings so expensive where you are, it sounds like you'd be happier living elsewhere.
    Every day I make the world a little bit worse.

  11. #11

    Re: Any of you know anything about complex post-traumatic stress disorder?

    Quote Originally Posted by mgtower View Post
    My only worry on my own is medical, some of the shit I do can be very dangerous. Material safety data sheets and SOP's (standard operating procedures) won't save me after the fact, everything I do has to be done with extra caution and I have 1st aid kits and basic knowhow to use them, but that won't help me if I'm torn in two, crushed, blown up, dead and smoldering! My biggest fear is personal injury, beyond that, the peace and tranquility is breathtaking! Many years ago, I drove myself to the emergency room late at night while going in shock from an injury, now that the hospital is closed, the drive is 10 times further! You can keep your doctor but not your hospital!

    The rust belt saga continues and spreads with another brutal round of economic strangulation, starvation, and stagnation via excessive taxation and what amounts to executive negligence!
    Batshit crazy is behind the wheel! WTF?
    Age is catching up to me and the associated early problems are starting to appear. Doctors visits are becoming more frequent. Fortunately, I've been able to take care of myself. I've even had to fake a post-surgery caregiver, something I didn't need, to get authorized for surgery. In the age of Uber/Lyft, they wouldn't let me take ride sharing as a means of transportation and forced me into a far more expensive option.

    Like everyone else, I'll get old, sick and die. No one escapes the grim reaper. Billions have come and gone before me. If they can do it, so can I.

    The entire game is rigged to lubelessly and brutally rape you. If you don't figure this out before it's too late, you die a disposable fool. The system rarely suffers fools. I, in fact, was one such exception to the rule. An outlier. An anomaly. I shouldn't be.

    But I'd rather die than let another waking nightmare into my life. I'm hip to the rigged, anti-male game and prefer death to the con artistry that purports, "All you need is a good woman." Not this guy. Never again. I know too much.

    Until they completely destroy your life, ignorance and self-delusion are sheer bliss.

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    Sex is the bait. Marriage is the trap. Divorce rape is the goal.

  12. #12
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    Re: Any of you know anything about complex post-traumatic stress disorder?

    There's two types of PTSD. Acute PTSD, which is the result of a single traumatic experience, and Complex PTSD, which is the result of a series of continual traumatic experiences. C-PTSD most often results from extended periods of abuse, and yes, it does "stick". I've been diagnosed with C-PTSD, from six years of daily beatings as a child. And it's very much about the "fight or flight" instinct becoming normalized. You -grow- into it. It's been 30 years since the abuse stopped, but I'm still constantly expecting attack. I became extremely non-confrontational (doormat) as a result of it. Just the other day I had a panic attack, expecting somebody to come hurt me, simply for hanging around with some strangers for a few hours (I'll tell you about that in another post).

    It really sucks, hard. Because you can be trying to have a normal day, and then suddenly you are terrified for no reason whatsoever. I do have a type of medication specifically to combat panic attacks, and it's a lifesaver. There are other things which can be done to comfort yourself, though. Believe it or not, prepping is a great idea. You start learning skills and buying equipment to build a nice "everyday carry" (EDC). I carry pepper spray and a knife, flashlight and a multi-tool. My car is stocked with food and a medkit. And yes, these things make life convenient. You might be surprised how often you need a pocket knife. I also bought a camper so I will never be without housing again, stocked with food as well. I'm still quite non-confrontational, and now that I make ghosting my go-to response in terms of bad situations (with women as well as everyday life) I feel much, much safer than I used to.

    Go ahead and look up EDC on youtube, you'll find a shit-ton of videos about it.

  13. #13

    Re: Any of you know anything about complex post-traumatic stress disorder?

    Quote Originally Posted by ScrewJita View Post
    There's two types of PTSD. Acute PTSD, which is the result of a single traumatic experience, and Complex PTSD, which is the result of a series of continual traumatic experiences. C-PTSD most often results from extended periods of abuse, and yes, it does "stick". I've been diagnosed with C-PTSD, from six years of daily beatings as a child. And it's very much about the "fight or flight" instinct becoming normalized. You -grow- into it. It's been 30 years since the abuse stopped, but I'm still constantly expecting attack. I became extremely non-confrontational (doormat) as a result of it. Just the other day I had a panic attack, expecting somebody to come hurt me, simply for hanging around with some strangers for a few hours (I'll tell you about that in another post).

    It really sucks, hard. Because you can be trying to have a normal day, and then suddenly you are terrified for no reason whatsoever. I do have a type of medication specifically to combat panic attacks, and it's a lifesaver. There are other things which can be done to comfort yourself, though. Believe it or not, prepping is a great idea. You start learning skills and buying equipment to build a nice "everyday carry" (EDC). I carry pepper spray and a knife, flashlight and a multi-tool. My car is stocked with food and a medkit. And yes, these things make life convenient. You might be surprised how often you need a pocket knife. I also bought a camper so I will never be without housing again, stocked with food as well. I'm still quite non-confrontational, and now that I make ghosting my go-to response in terms of bad situations (with women as well as everyday life) I feel much, much safer than I used to.

    Go ahead and look up EDC on youtube, you'll find a shit-ton of videos about it.
    I had a brief period of around four months where I experienced intense anxiety with bouts of complete insomnia lasting for days. After the third day without sleep, I'd feel like I was coming unglued. Every time I laid down, I'd feel an intense flight response and have to rocket out of bed. I'd pace, then try to sleep, rocket back up and repeat this process over and over. Then, just as abruptly as it started, it ended. I used self-soothing techniques and talk therapy to get through it. Because I became desperate, at several points in that four month period, I thought about having myself locked up. For that brief part in my life, anxiety and insomnia ruled over and tortured me.

    I had only a brief glimpse of what PTSD must be like. You'd have to be an incredibly strong person to deal with it on a ongoing basis. I am sorry you suffer this way. I very much enjoy reading your posts and thank you for all you're doing to help others find their way.
    Sex is the bait. Marriage is the trap. Divorce rape is the goal.

  14. #14
    Senior Member mgtower's Avatar
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    Re: Any of you know anything about complex post-traumatic stress disorder?

    Quote Originally Posted by ScrewJita View Post
    There's two types of PTSD. Acute PTSD, which is the result of a single traumatic experience, and Complex PTSD, which is the result of a series of continual traumatic experiences. C-PTSD most often results from extended periods of abuse, and yes, it does "stick". I've been diagnosed with C-PTSD, from six years of daily beatings as a child. And it's very much about the "fight or flight" instinct becoming normalized. You -grow- into it. It's been 30 years since the abuse stopped, but I'm still constantly expecting attack. I became extremely non-confrontational (doormat) as a result of it. Just the other day I had a panic attack, expecting somebody to come hurt me, simply for hanging around with some strangers for a few hours (I'll tell you about that in another post).

    It really sucks, hard. Because you can be trying to have a normal day, and then suddenly you are terrified for no reason whatsoever. I do have a type of medication specifically to combat panic attacks, and it's a lifesaver. There are other things which can be done to comfort yourself, though. Believe it or not, prepping is a great idea. You start learning skills and buying equipment to build a nice "everyday carry" (EDC). I carry pepper spray and a knife, flashlight and a multi-tool. My car is stocked with food and a medkit. And yes, these things make life convenient. You might be surprised how often you need a pocket knife. I also bought a camper so I will never be without housing again, stocked with food as well. I'm still quite non-confrontational, and now that I make ghosting my go-to response in terms of bad situations (with women as well as everyday life) I feel much, much safer than I used to.

    Go ahead and look up EDC on youtube, you'll find a shit-ton of videos about it.
    Mine came from racial violence, muggings, attacks, and guns being drawn on me when I lived in the city. Rustbelt cities are the warzones nobody talks about yet the bodies keep piling up! My PTSD makes me take inland roads less traveled to avoid places like NYC. Nearby cities I stay away from the wrong side of the tracks, I don't go through the inner city without being ready to step on the gas to avoid a jacking, my awareness to my surroundings is heightened for attack.

    When I was 19, I entered the world of martial arts to help me with my fears of attack, I practiced relentlessly for 20+ years. I see the similarities plain as day but I don't think I have it as bad to call it complex because it's so specific, it's related directly to being attacked or the bullying I endured by tyrants wearing badges.
    Corruption, like low tide, lowers all boats and smashes their hulls on the rocks.

  15. #15
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    Re: Any of you know anything about complex post-traumatic stress disorder?

    Quote Originally Posted by FireBird View Post
    Okay so I made a post on .win about my parents arguing which I also did on this forum and this one user mentioned something about Complex post-traumatic stress disorder on .win?



    The thing is though I've been in situations where people yelled at each other but I never left the area or room I was. However, in school I sometimes did ask to go to the bathroom in school when it did get too loud but I don't think it was severe enough to be noticeable. I'm not asking the question in the title because I want people to feel sorry for me or to be awarded victimhood points. All I want to know is what's up with this so called complex PTSD because I never heard of that in my life. I did a little research on it but I didn't manage to get too much info on it. I don't know if that has to do with the reason I'd been always putting headphones on when my parents ever so get slightly loud and at one point had to leave the house last week due to the arguing to prevent myself from going insane.
    I’m no doctor as will be evident from this post but I’d suggest you’re not suffering from PTSD, complex or otherwise.

    My apologies if this post seems somewhat cold but I don’t believe pretence will benefit you in any way.

    PTSD – POST Traumatic Stress Syndrome, with emphasis on the word “post”.

    This word “post” indicates that the traumatic events have passed, ceased to exist, and now one is trying to come to terms with their actions or lack thereof.

    When people are in traumatic situations they act in certain ways, usually reactionary and often leave the morality of the situation to be contemplated upon at another time.

    It is my belief, backed up by exactly zero research that I am aware of but am pretty sure exists, that PTSD is the attempt to bring two separate philosophies together after the fact.

    This does not describe you. It seems you are still living through the trauma and my advice would be not to even try to diffuse the situation that you find yourself in, but to extract yourself from it ASAP.

    Only then can you begin the healing process.

  16. #16
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    Re: Any of you know anything about complex post-traumatic stress disorder?

    Concerning the OP: Okay, so the fact is, that you are currently living in a Crisis Situation. Sure, it's not the same as a literal war-zone, but it's bad. It's bad and you need to get out of it, ASAP. Your primary priority should be getting your own place. This can be difficult. Car-living is an option. Look up https://www.reddit.com/r/urbancarliving/ IT is not an easy life, but extremely inexpensive, and can help you save up the deposits to get your own joint.

    And there is something else you should be aware of. The fact is, that humans are an animal species, and so the things which apply to animals apply to us as well. Animals which have adapted to survive a crisis situation tend to be lean, hard and angry. That's you. Once they get out of that situation, they become normal. But what most people don't know, is that once such an animal reaches a safe situation, they go through a period of "normalization". They collapse. I've heard stories of dogs who, after being adopted, fell down and could not move for three days. I've done it myself, after I got off the streets, and it is very frightening. It will strike you emotionally, you'll probably cry alot. But please understand that this is Mother Nature doing her good work. You are not weak, you are surviving.

    Just watch out for that.

  17. #17

    Re: Any of you know anything about complex post-traumatic stress disorder?

    I'm pretty sure I have C-PTSD, ScrewJita's description of it is right on. Mine has come from over a decade of constant stress/trauma from family betrayals, divorce, custody battles, work stress, false accusations, legal battles. It's made it so that its extremely hard to get out of the fight or flight state, and in fact, as bad as that state is for you, it's the only time you feel "normal". You've basically become a tool who only functions in conflict/stress. You are always waiting for the other shoe to drop, for the next thing around the corner that's going to maul you. It's often permanent, but you can definitely heal to some degree from it over time. I want to share the best things I've found that have helped me have some healing: 1) Complex Ptsd: From Surviving to Thriving by Pete Walker. Absolutely pick up this book. 2) Polyvagal theory (recognizing when you're in the fight/flight state and how to get out). 3) Multiple days hiking in nature, this is one of the best treatments for it, read the book The 3-Day Effect. 4) meditation. 5) Oh, and I hear that EDMR can be very helpful, though I haven't really tried it. My own condition is manageable now, but I have to be constantly vigilant and aware of how I'm doing and actively parent myself to keep the C-PTSD at bay.The 3-Day EffectThe

    The 3-Day Effect
    Last edited by micro_peanuts; May 2, 2022 at 1:59 AM.

  18. #18

    Re: Any of you know anything about complex post-traumatic stress disorder?

    Yeah... "warzones" do it.
    Yeah... "violence" does it.
    Yeah... "torture" does it.
    Yeah people are fucked up bc of fucked up people.

    Then, you get into, who started it all.

    One thing I know is that people that have PTSD, or C-PTSD, they DONT talk about it! If you need help, seek help. If they can fix it good. If they cant, guess what, you have a best friend.


    The worst thing you can do, is depend on a women, for "emotional support." Never trust a women! There will never be something called emotional support. Emotional support is a luxury. Mental health is a luxury. Having a "home" is a luxury.


    Dont give a shit about anyone. No one gives a shit about you. Thats the truth. Accept it, move on.

    You grow up developing a trust with: a women, a goverment, a friend, a organization, a doctor, a religion, a school, a race ect... Then one day it happens. You don't forget.


    MGTOW! Value yourself. Give yourself value. Dont give a shit about anyone. Hate your job, quit.


    Learn what it means to be free. Free from negative thinking. Free from a shit job. Free from risking your life, for what. Free from being with women, for what. Free from race, for what. Stop living in "their" world. Its your life, enjoy it until your "best friend" shows up.

  19. #19
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    Re: Any of you know anything about complex post-traumatic stress disorder?

    Quote Originally Posted by 44barnanimal View Post
    Yeah... "warzones" do it.
    Yeah... "violence" does it.
    Yeah... "torture" does it.
    Yeah people are fucked up bc of fucked up people.

    Then, you get into, who started it all.

    One thing I know is that people that have PTSD, or C-PTSD, they DONT talk about it! If you need help, seek help. If they can fix it good. If they cant, guess what, you have a best friend.


    The worst thing you can do, is depend on a women, for "emotional support." Never trust a women! There will never be something called emotional support. Emotional support is a luxury. Mental health is a luxury. Having a "home" is a luxury.


    Dont give a shit about anyone. No one gives a shit about you. Thats the truth. Accept it, move on.

    You grow up developing a trust with: a women, a goverment, a friend, a organization, a doctor, a religion, a school, a race ect... Then one day it happens. You don't forget.


    MGTOW! Value yourself. Give yourself value. Dont give a shit about anyone. Hate your job, quit.


    Learn what it means to be free. Free from negative thinking. Free from a shit job. Free from risking your life, for what. Free from being with women, for what. Free from race, for what. Stop living in "their" world. Its your life, enjoy it until your "best friend" shows up.
    Wise words, but the coming to this realisation can be a long and painful process.

    Most people, even nearest and dearest don’t want to hear about your problems. I learned this the hard way. I always try to be open to the problems of others even if it just means letting them pour out their hearts, but when my turn came around they weren’t prepared to return the favour. It was an eye-opener.

    The amount of egocentrism around needs to be understood and accepted. Their problems are huge problems that everyone should be addressing but the problems of others are nothing more than an annoyance to be avoided.

    Maybe most people’s “worry baskets” are full and they are unable, or unwilling, to take on the worries of others – they just don’t seem to want to know, but it is possible to take the time to listen without becoming overly invested and sometimes that’s all that’s needed.

  20. #20
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    Re: Any of you know anything about complex post-traumatic stress disorder?

    I'm a psychotherapist, and I've worked with first responders to assess PTSD and traumatic stress. In a previous role, I was called out to meet with prison officers, paramedics, police etc to carry out assessments for PTSD following an incident such as a death in custody.

    I can answer any questions via message if you want.

    Other than that, it looks like whoever wrote the text quoted in the black box has been hyperbolic with the term C-PTSD. People often misuse clinical terms - especially Gen-Z I've noticed.

    Anyway, the speaker looks like they are trying to highlight the fact that an emotionally abusive or emotionally neglectful childhood can lead to anxiety as an adult, because of the way that the brain is shaped by the lack of stable, loving emotional security.

    This emotional neglect or abuse may or may not lead to trauma symptoms. Note that trauma is clinically defined as exposure to actual or threatened death, serious injury, or sexual violence. So for there to be PTSD, or C-PTSD, there must be a trauma as defined in the clinical sense. The problem here is that in ordinary parlance an untoward or stressful event is labelled "traumatic"

    Therefore a childhood where parents were getting divorced and child witnesses one parent threatening to kill the other, or learns that one parent threatened to kill the other - trauma in the clinical sense. Look for the clusters of symptoms below to assess potential PTSD.

    Child witnessing bitter divorce where parents gave each other the silent treatment, were absent as parents and occasionally yelled at each other - traumatic in ordinary speech, but no clincial trauma therefore cannot lead to PTSD. However it can lead to anxiety, insecurity, low self-esteem and so on. This is the basis that people might go around saying "I was traumatised by my parents divorce".

    DSM-5 Diagnostic Criteria for PTSD

    Note: The following criteria apply to adults, adolescents, and children older than 6 years. For children 6 years and younger, see the DSM-5 section titled “Posttraumatic Stress Disorder for Children 6 Years and Younger” (APA, 2013a).

    1. Exposure to actual or threatened death, serious injury, or sexual violence in one (or more) of the following ways:
      1. Directly experiencing the traumatic event(s).
      2. Witnessing, in person, the event(s) as it occurred to others.
      3. Learning that the traumatic event(s) occurred to a close family member or close friend. In cases of actual or threatened death of a family member or friend, the event(s) must have been violent or accidental.
      4. Experiencing repeated or extreme exposure to aversive details of the traumatic event(s) (e.g., first responders collecting human remains; police officers repeatedly exposed to details of child abuse). Note: Criterion A4 does not apply to exposure through electronic media, television, movies, or pictures, unless this exposure is work related.

    2. Presence of one (or more) of the following intrusion symptoms associated with the traumatic event(s), beginning after the traumatic event(s) occurred:
      1. Recurrent, involuntary, and intrusive distressing memories of the traumatic event(s). Note: In children older than 6 years, repetitive play may occur in which themes or aspects of the traumatic event(s) are expressed.
      2. Recurrent distressing dreams in which the content and/or affect of the dream are related to the traumatic event(s). Note: In children, there may be frightening dreams without recognizable content.
      3. Dissociative reactions (e.g., flashbacks) in which the individual feels or acts as if the traumatic event(s) were recurring. (Such reactions may occur on a continuum, with the most extreme expression being a complete loss of awareness of present surroundings.) Note: In children, trauma-specific reenactment may occur in play.
      4. Intense or prolonged psychological distress at exposure to internal or external cues that symbolize or resemble an aspect of the traumatic event(s).
      5. Marked physiological reactions to internal or external cues that symbolize or resemble an aspect of the traumatic event(s).

    3. Persistent avoidance of stimuli associated with the traumatic event(s), beginning after the traumatic event(s) occurred, as evidenced by one or both of the following:
      1. Avoidance of or efforts to avoid distressing memories, thoughts, or feelings about or closely associated with the traumatic event(s).
      2. Avoidance of or efforts to avoid external reminders (people, places, conversations, activities, objects, situations) that arouse distressing memories, thoughts, or feelings about or closely associated with the traumatic event(s).

    4. Negative alterations in cognitions and mood associated with the traumatic event(s), beginning or worsening after the traumatic event(s) occurred, as evidenced by two (or more) of the following:
      1. Inability to remember an important aspect of the traumatic event(s) (typically due to dissociative amnesia, and not to other factors such as head injury, alcohol, or drugs).
      2. Persistent and exaggerated negative beliefs or expectations about oneself, others, or the world (e.g., “I am bad,” “No one can be trusted,” “The world is completely dangerous,” “My whole nervous system is permanently ruined”).
      3. Persistent, distorted cognitions about the cause or consequences of the traumatic event(s) that lead the individual to blame himself/herself or others.
      4. Persistent negative emotional state (e.g., fear, horror, anger, guilt, or shame).
      5. Markedly diminished interest or participation in significant activities.
      6. Feelings of detachment or estrangement from others.
      7. Persistent inability to experience positive emotions (e.g., inability to experience happiness, satisfaction, or loving feelings).

    5. Marked alterations in arousal and reactivity associated with the traumatic event(s), beginning or worsening after the traumatic event(s) occurred, as evidenced by two (or more) of the following:
      1. Irritable behavior and angry outbursts (with little or no provocation), typically expressed as verbal or physical aggression toward people or objects.
      2. Reckless or self-destructive behavior.
      3. Hypervigilance.
      4. Exaggerated startle response.
      5. Problems with concentration.
      6. Sleep disturbance (e.g., difficulty falling or staying asleep or restless sleep).

    6. Duration of the disturbance (Criteria B, C, D and E) is more than 1 month.
    7. The disturbance causes clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.
    8. The disturbance is not attributable to the physiological effects of a substance (e.g., medication, alcohol) or another medical condition.
    Last edited by Jacknife; May 3, 2022 at 1:40 PM.


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