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  1. #1

    Will alternative housing get big in America?

    With wages in the US being so shitty for so many people, many people have resorted to housing alternatives such as tiny houses, RVs, stealth trucks, etc. The thing is you always need a place to put these alternative lodgings. Some people are lucky in that a house owner may let you live in your tiny house or RV on their property, but not everyone can count on that.

    It makes me wonder if sometimes a group of people could combine resources and buy a large enough lot of land for a community of tiny house dwellers. Maybe they could even afford a club house where you get your mail, and maybe it would have a community room and a workout center. And everyone parks their cars, if they have one, in a parking lot outside the actual tiny house area. So you own your own tiny area of land where you put your small house, that's good quality and big enough for you.

    With it being so insanely expensive to buy a home, and with even rents being absorbent, maybe something like this could work. They could do something similar for RV owners. You would have your own home base land when you're not traveling, and it would have all the RV hookups and an address.

    I rent an apartment, and it's in a state where it's less expensive than others, but it still takes up a major chunk of my income. It makes me wonder if something like a tiny house, an RV, a modular home, or a stealth truck could be a better deal. It seems sad to spend so much on rent every month, and that money just goes to making the property owners wealthy. It doesn't even help with your credit, which is absurd. If you pay a big rent payment every month, that shows financial stability.

    In America, some people end up on the streets, living in tents or worse makeshift lodgings our of cardboard boxes or some shit. It would be way better to have people in something like a tiny house, a cottage, or an RV.

  2. #2

    Re: Will alternative housing get big in America?

    No, because the gov can't milk you for taxes and you don't mindlessly spend money for the economy aka the rich.

    If it's allowed would be some sort of fee or like the homeless situation once there are too many of you and no money to be made ignore you in a corner.

  3. #3
    Senior Member O.G.'s Avatar
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    Re: Will alternative housing get big in America?

    It seems sad to spend so much on rent every month, and that money just goes to making the property owners wealthy.
    As a former landlord I have to ask you this. Do you expect landlords to be humanitarian? I should buy a property. Maintain it. Deal with all the drama today's tenants bring. Pay property tax and insurance.

    Just to be a nice guy and help out the world?

    Oh yeah almost forgot. Then let the Feds decide that during the Covid shutdown I need to let you live there for free. All the while I need to keep the place repaired or maintained. While paying the mortgage with no rent? Care to guess how much in back Covid rent has been paid to landlords from those tenants who took advantage?

    Do you feel the same way about buying food? Because I hate to tell you. Mr. Grocery store owner is in it for the money too. Yet we hear plenty about landlords. Not so much about grocers.

    Yes there is an affordable housing problem. Landlord bashing is not the way to fix it.
    "People are always angry at anyone who chooses very individual standards for his life; because of the extraordinary treatment which that man grants to himself, they feel degraded, like ordinary beings."
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    Re: Will alternative housing get big in America?

    I'd like to see something like what you're talking about, but I don't see it happening. For one thing, developing raw land will kill you. Planning it all, roads, electricity, sewage, landscaping, tax's, water, fences and who knows what else. Especially water. Wells cost the earth, and there's no guarantee you'll ever hit water though most people do. Anybody individual or group who could afford all this doesn't have to worry about a place to live. You'd be hard pressed to develop a place of your own, let alone one with room for anyone else.

    If you could start with some abandoned industrial property that had some services to start with, that would have a better chance of sucess, though the permits would probably kill you. But even then, what would you have? A trailer park, or maybe an HOA if the rules were snooty. I don't like trailer parks or HOA's.

    I wouldn't want to partner up with just anyone either. And even with people you know and trust, there is sometimes trouble. You don't want other people making decisions about your home.

    Being a derelict, my house wasn't fit to live in. But it had electricity, a septic tank and was hooked up to a neighborhood water system. I parked my school bus in the driveway and lived in it till the house was ready. I don't think you could do it much cheaper than this. If the house had been beyond help, it would have been easy and fairly cheap to move a tiny house or some other trailer in. The land and services are what you need way more than the old house.
    Last edited by frog; September 16, 2022 at 4:12 PM.
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    Senior Member O.G.'s Avatar
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    Re: Will alternative housing get big in America?

    Frog laid down the facts about trying to develop something. He is also very right about the main deal is to have a chunk of land with services in place.

    If you let the Fed's get involved they are going to try and build one thing. High rise apartment blocks. Going vertical is the cheapest way to house a large group of people. It's also a bad way to live. Especially if you have kids. Tough to watch your kid play outside. From a 15th floor apartment window. Years back high rise is what the Fed's did. It's a large part of what brought about section 8 housing vouchers. Feds learned that rather than build, maintain and manage high rises. It was cheaper for them to just pay a good chunk of a person's rent. In a private owned property. Outsourced public housing per se.

    The most infuriating thing to me. Is how all the political and social time and energy is being wasted on ridiculous endeavors. People spend their time arguing pronouns. Who is the latest group for victim status. Drag queen story hour in schools and so forth. While an issue as vital as how we can better house people gets sidelined.
    "People are always angry at anyone who chooses very individual standards for his life; because of the extraordinary treatment which that man grants to himself, they feel degraded, like ordinary beings."
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  6. #6

    Re: Will alternative housing get big in America?

    Quote Originally Posted by O.G. View Post
    As a former landlord I have to ask you this. Do you expect landlords to be humanitarian? I should buy a property. Maintain it. Deal with all the drama today's tenants bring. Pay property tax and insurance.

    Just to be a nice guy and help out the world?

    Oh yeah almost forgot. Then let the Feds decide that during the Covid shutdown I need to let you live there for free. All the while I need to keep the place repaired or maintained. While paying the mortgage with no rent? Care to guess how much in back Covid rent has been paid to landlords from those tenants who took advantage?

    Do you feel the same way about buying food? Because I hate to tell you. Mr. Grocery store owner is in it for the money too. Yet we hear plenty about landlords. Not so much about grocers.

    Yes there is an affordable housing problem. Landlord bashing is not the way to fix it.
    Thanks for putting words in my mouth that I didn't even remotely say. I said paying rent ends up wasting your money, and it adds to someone else's wealth. That's just a fact. I could say the same thing about buying a leather jacket. That doesn't mean I'm bashing the store or the wholesaler who sells them? And all that shit about COVID? WTF???? If I need an example of being off topic, now I have a great one.

    Next time put words into someone else's mouth, or better yet, into no one's.

  7. #7

    Re: Will alternative housing get big in America?

    Quote Originally Posted by frog View Post
    I'd like to see something like what you're talking about, but I don't see it happening. For one thing, developing raw land will kill you. Planning it all, roads, electricity, sewage, landscaping, tax's, water, fences and who knows what else. Especially water. Wells cost the earth, and there's no guarantee you'll ever hit water though most people do. Anybody individual or group who could afford all this doesn't have to worry about a place to live. You'd be hard pressed to develop a place of your own, let alone one with room for anyone else.

    If you could start with some abandoned industrial property that had some services to start with, that would have a better chance of sucess, though the permits would probably kill you. But even then, what would you have? A trailer park, or maybe an HOA if the rules were snooty. I don't like trailer parks or HOA's.

    I wouldn't want to partner up with just anyone either. And even with people you know and trust, there is sometimes trouble. You don't want other people making decisions about your home.

    Being a derelict, my house wasn't fit to live in. But it had electricity, a septic tank and was hooked up to a neighborhood water system. I parked my school bus in the driveway and lived in it till the house was ready. I don't think you could do it much cheaper than this. If the house had been beyond help, it would have been easy and fairly cheap to move a tiny house or some other trailer in. The land and services are what you need way more than the old house.
    Yeah, you have to be careful about land buying. The laws change in every state and in every county. On some land it's not even legal to dig a well. If there's a stream or river nearby, it's probably not legal to get your water from that either. In some places, it's not legal to collect rain water -- that one seems bizarre to me.

    I would be interested to see how Joker, aka Better Bachelor, is doing with his school bus project. He bought one of those and was converting it into a residence. Sounds like a cool idea. Then you know everything that you've installed. I've heard horror stories about getting lemon RVs.

  8. #8
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    Re: Will alternative housing get big in America?

    When I hear "alternative housing", I think "affordable housing". Is that a fair thing to say?

    Quote Originally Posted by O.G. View Post
    If you let the Fed's get involved they are going to try and build one thing. High rise apartment blocks. Going vertical is the cheapest way to house a large group of people.
    I don't like when my city wants to ban single-family homes and encourage condo stacks and condo canyons. They're building the stacks and canyons for sure and although they always say they include affordable housing (ha, love that phrase bandied about here in expensive Seattle), that phrase seems to be a phony way of getting developments approved when I see nothing ever "affordable" (affordable to whom?) or maybe the developer simply passes extra money to the city using that phrase to get their plans approved and the city smiles and nods and spends it any way they want. The condos are never cheap and I have to believe these low square footage condo units do not fill up with families including for the reasons you gave.

    There's an implication that smaller is better but I just don't see it. When hear "smaller is better", I think "smaller is better for city coffers". They can pack more incomes into their tax jurisdiction.

    So building upwards in existing areas, making people live in smaller spaces, stacked up into the sky, isn't doing a damn thing for affordable housing as far as I can tell. It brings in people who make good enough money to pay the market rate prices, taps into more individual incomes for property taxes, is what I can see. Or maybe the newspapers should do a better job providing the data to show how many people are currently enjoying affordable housing (for all of the hullabaloo the leaders have made about it) when they periodically write their articles about how we currently lack affordable housing. So, do we still lack it, or do we lack more of it? If the former, what has the city been doing all of this time? If the latter, where are the affordable housing in my city that previous years was supposed to have created? Did these affordable places slowly meld into market rates as time went by? How come I never hear about them?

    So I'm floundering here in a lack of knowledge, but really I wanted to ask you for your insights on this next part:

    Sooner or later, some developer in any city opens up a previously undeveloped section of land to build single family homes with yards, even if sandwiched in with only front and back yards and no side yards to speak of. A new subdivision of single family homes. Yes, I note that they are going against the current zeitgeist of more denser living but my bigger notice is that "going vertical" is not the only way that they continue to build.

    So, why can't it pencil out to the developers to build a new community of affordable homes away from the city core, for income qualifying people, a modern-day Levittown, minus its racial covenants of course, assuming the political will is there?
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  9. #9
    Senior Member O.G.'s Avatar
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    Re: Will alternative housing get big in America?

    Quote Originally Posted by TigPlaze View Post
    Thanks for putting words in my mouth that I didn't even remotely say. I said paying rent ends up wasting your money, and it adds to someone else's wealth. That's just a fact. I could say the same thing about buying a leather jacket. That doesn't mean I'm bashing the store or the wholesaler who sells them? And all that shit about COVID? WTF???? If I need an example of being off topic, now I have a great one.

    Next time put words into someone else's mouth, or better yet, into no one's.
    See it how you want. The point was YOUR comment about making landlords wealthy. Nothing more. You're the one reading more into it. Getting real defensive too.

    I was talking about the amount of costs that a landlord pays out of your rent paid to him. That after you deduct from the income. There isn't always much profit left.

    I rent an apartment, and it's in a state where it's less expensive than others, but it still takes up a major chunk of my income. It makes me wonder if something like a tiny house, an RV, a modular home, or a stealth truck could be a better deal. It seems sad to spend so much on rent every month, and that money just goes to making the property owners wealthy. It doesn't even help with your credit, which is absurd. If you pay a big rent payment every month, that shows financial stability.
    I included a larger part of your post. I think you are putting words in your post that were never written. I sure can't find any phrase in your original post that indicates
    I said paying rent ends up wasting your money,
    Those words do not appear in the post I replied to. It's just you back peddling on saying rent enriches a landlord. I say no more so than any other business. Hence my grocery store reference.

    The shit about Covid off topic?

    Wasn't about covid the virus. Rather the covid rent moratorium that the Feds saddled landlords with. That tenants could stop paying rent. Those who did stop paying. Have made little or no effort to repay.

    Next time you can refrain from putting words into your post. After you wrote them. To deny what you said about landlords.

    Skeet/skeet in my book. I'll drop it with you if you will.
    "People are always angry at anyone who chooses very individual standards for his life; because of the extraordinary treatment which that man grants to himself, they feel degraded, like ordinary beings."
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  10. #10
    Senior Member O.G.'s Avatar
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    Re: Will alternative housing get big in America?

    Quote Originally Posted by Unboxxed View Post
    When I hear "alternative housing", I think "affordable housing". Is that a fair thing to say?



    I don't like when my city wants to ban single-family homes and encourage condo stacks and condo canyons. They're building the stacks and canyons for sure and although they always say they include affordable housing (ha, love that phrase bandied about here in expensive Seattle), that phrase seems to be a phony way of getting developments approved when I see nothing ever "affordable" (affordable to whom?) or maybe the developer simply passes extra money to the city using that phrase to get their plans approved and the city smiles and nods and spends it any way they want. The condos are never cheap and I have to believe these low square footage condo units do not fill up with families including for the reasons you gave.

    There's an implication that smaller is better but I just don't see it. When hear "smaller is better", I think "smaller is better for city coffers". They can pack more incomes into their tax jurisdiction.

    So building upwards in existing areas, making people live in smaller spaces, stacked up into the sky, isn't doing a damn thing for affordable housing as far as I can tell. It brings in people who make good enough money to pay the market rate prices, taps into more individual incomes for property taxes, is what I can see. Or maybe the newspapers should do a better job providing the data to show how many people are currently enjoying affordable housing (for all of the hullabaloo the leaders have made about it) when they periodically write their articles about how we currently lack affordable housing. So, do we still lack it, or do we lack more of it? If the former, what has the city been doing all of this time? If the latter, where are the affordable housing in my city that previous years was supposed to have created? Did these affordable places slowly meld into market rates as time went by? How come I never hear about them?

    So I'm floundering here in a lack of knowledge, but really I wanted to ask you for your insights on this next part:

    Sooner or later, some developer in any city opens up a previously undeveloped section of land to build single family homes with yards, even if sandwiched in with only front and back yards and no side yards to speak of. A new subdivision of single family homes. Yes, I note that they are going against the current zeitgeist of more denser living but my bigger notice is that "going vertical" is not the only way that they continue to build.

    So, why can't it pencil out to the developers to build a new community of affordable homes away from the city core, for income qualifying people, a modern-day Levittown, minus its racial covenants of course, assuming the political will is there?

    I was speaking to two things regarding the lower cost of high rise housing.

    OP refereed to making property owners wealthy. Only way to pay rent and NOT pay a private landlord is to be in government owned buildings. Public housing. The second point of affordability. It was directed to construction costs. Nothing more.

    I will use the public housing from back in the day in Chicago as an example. Mayor Richard J. Daley had a huge section of the city with dilapidated Victorian era housing. To the point of being third world slum level. He wanted to change that. Was the first mayor to get money from the Fed's to do that too. Only one huge problem. The money as only available if a certain number of units were built. The ONLY way he could hit that number was to build vertically. The money would not support the cost to build scattered low rise public housing.

    The high rises quickly proved to be a disaster from a quality of life standpoint. A legendary disaster. So much so that it was a large factor in the birth of the section 8 housing voucher program. In effect outsourcing of public housing to private landlords.

    So that is what I meant by affordable. Affordable to the government at the time when they were building housing.

    So I'm floundering here in a lack of knowledge, but really I wanted to ask you for your insights on this next part:

    Sooner or later, some developer in any city opens up a previously undeveloped section of land to build single family homes with yards, even if sandwiched in with only front and back yards and no side yards to speak of. A new subdivision of single family homes. Yes, I note that they are going against the current zeitgeist of more denser living but my bigger notice is that "going vertical" is not the only way that they continue to build.

    So, why can't it pencil out to the developers to build a new community of affordable homes away from the city core, for income qualifying people, a modern-day Levittown, minus its racial covenants of course, assuming the political will is there?
    The most current and best example of affordable housing I have seen is less than three blocks from my house. I live in a tiny town. The bulk of the jobs here are minimum wage. We literally had no place for lower income people to live.

    The building is a private owned, former abandoned eyesore of a factory. Through a series of federal money and tax breaks the entire building was renovated into multiple loft style apartments.This type of development takes advantage of the cost reduction of a a property with the services required already in place. In order for that to happen the owners had to agree to 80% section 8 subsidized tenant occupancy. Only 20% market rate tenant occupancy. The project came out amazing. It truly is affordable housing to be proud of. Right here in town. With walk to work capability.

    In another post in this thread I stated my frustration at how so much time and energy is taken today talking about nonsensical topics. In government and the media. Putting those minds to work on solving housing affordability for the resident is the better thing to do.

    With today's cost for all of it. From land, development, construction and so forth. The only way I can see to NOT end up living in a tiny box is with government subsidy and tax breaks to assist in the development. Then making that housing only available to people who do not have the income for market rate housing.

    Not that there is anything wrong with living tiny if that is what you want to do. I think it has much more to do what is practical and achievable. Rather than ideal. I don't think the answer is the same for each community either. What worked in my town may not be the answer elsewhere.
    "People are always angry at anyone who chooses very individual standards for his life; because of the extraordinary treatment which that man grants to himself, they feel degraded, like ordinary beings."
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  11. #11

    Re: Will alternative housing get big in America?

    Most societies are a treadmill to make the government and rich people money to increase their power and influence at your expense. They won't easily let you get off the treadmill unless either a) You become one of them or b) You are so poor they bribe you with free shit for votes and as a tool of class warfare.

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    Re: Will alternative housing get big in America?

    Quote Originally Posted by TigPlaze View Post

    I would be interested to see how Joker, aka Better Bachelor, is doing with his school bus project. He bought one of those and was converting it into a residence. Sounds like a cool idea. Then you know everything that you've installed. I've heard horror stories about getting lemon RVs.
    I've heard those store bought RV horror stories too, but I wouldn't write them off completely. They don't seem so popular anymore, you might find a bargain that would be worth the trouble. But yeah, their built cheap considering what they cost. Wouldn't take much of a breakdown to really hurt you either.

    My bus was old, but mechanically sound. Got it cheap too, though I don't know what they cost now or how many people actually want one. Not many, I would think. It's not that hard or expensive to convert one either. True, it's made of metal instead of wood. But it's all common household upgrades, not rocket science. License it as a used truck, not an RV. Easier and cheaper.

    One downside is trailer parks seldom accept converted buses. Maybe if yours was really professionally done, they might. But probably not even then. The oldest park in town took mine, but they probably wouldn't do it again. My only other gripe is while a bus seems big on the road, it's not that roomy as a house. They got similar square footage as a tiny house, which ain't much. A nearby shed would help a lot. Depends on how much stuff you need, I guess.
    Last edited by frog; September 17, 2022 at 3:29 AM.
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  13. #13

    Re: Will alternative housing get big in America?

    Quote Originally Posted by O.G. View Post
    See it how you want. The point was YOUR comment about making landlords wealthy. Nothing more. You're the one reading more into it. Getting real defensive too.

    I was talking about the amount of costs that a landlord pays out of your rent paid to him. That after you deduct from the income. There isn't always much profit left.
    I included a larger part of your post. I think you are putting words in your post that were never written. I sure can't find any phrase in your original post that indicates Those words do not appear in the post I replied to. It's just you back peddling on saying rent enriches a landlord. I say no more so than any other business. Hence my grocery store reference.

    The shit about Covid off topic?

    Wasn't about covid the virus. Rather the covid rent moratorium that the Feds saddled landlords with. That tenants could stop paying rent. Those who did stop paying. Have made little or no effort to repay.

    Next time you can refrain from putting words into your post. After you wrote them. To deny what you said about landlords.

    Skeet/skeet in my book. I'll drop it with you if you will.
    Sure, I'll drop it. I just felt misinterpreted. I wasn't saying anyone should expect free rent, just that there might be other options, like owning a tiny home on a small piece of land. I could have responded more tactfully. I apologize for getting irate.

  14. #14

    Re: Will alternative housing get big in America?

    Quote Originally Posted by frog View Post
    I've heard those store bought RV horror stories too, but I wouldn't write them off completely. They don't seem so popular anymore, you might find a bargain that would be worth the trouble. But yeah, their built cheap considering what they cost. Wouldn't take much of a breakdown to really hurt you either.

    My bus was old, but mechanically sound. Got it cheap too, though I don't know what they cost now or how many people actually want one. Not many, I would think. It's not that hard or expensive to convert one either. True, it's made of metal instead of wood. But it's all common household upgrades, not rocket science. License it as a used truck, not an RV. Easier and cheaper.

    One downside is trailer parks seldom accept converted buses. Maybe if yours was really professionally done, they might. But probably not even then. The oldest park in town took mine, but they probably wouldn't do it again. My only other gripe is while a bus seems big on the road, it's not that roomy as a house. They got similar square footage as a tiny house, which ain't much. A nearby shed would help a lot. Depends on how much stuff you need, I guess.
    Yeah, I wouldn't totally rule out an RV. There are good ones. I would refer you to Steve Lehto's Youtube videos about RVs. He's a lawyer who has represented RV owners who got lemons. One big problem is there's often not one single warranty. You've got a warranty for the engine, and another one for the fridge, and another one for the restroom-installed stuff, etc. If you get a lemon, you can't just return it. Every bit of the RV could be great, except the bathroom with a toilet always getting clogged, the shower not working, but that's enough to basically ruin the RV's usefulness.

    It doesn't mean it's impossible to get a good RV. You'd just better really do your research well and protect yourself.

    Some people who've done really well are those who have built a tiny house, and then a friend let them park it and hook it up in a back yard for a nominal monthly fee. However, you can't count on finding someone like that, and some housing association rules don't allow for it anyway. I'm also not completely sold on having something as small as about 400 square feet. It could get cramped. I'd rather at least have a cottage-sized house, but then you're no longer exempt from building codes.

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    Re: Will alternative housing get big in America?

    I think it could be a good commercial venture because its kind of trendy now, the idea is even promoted by the mainstream media.
    There are many examples of tv programming promoting tiny houses going back to roughly 2012 (ya know the end of the world).

    I agree rent is too high, but so is everything else. All the rising costs will push people towards tiny home living.
    I am working on it myself. At the moment I am fixing up my house to sell it to then buy a liveaboard sailboat.
    Fees to live are way more cheap, but there are a lot of costs to consider i.e. maintenance, moorings, no garage etc.
    I want to be as free as possible to make my own decisions on the cost of living. I looked at a motorhome but the cost of living on that seemed to be a lot higher.
    The vans/motorhomes in recent years have gone up in price considerably. I know of people that have bought a motorhome prior to all this nonsense and have sold it recently for a tidy profit.
    Fuel, road tax and insurance should be taken into consideration.

    What your talking about sounds like a cooperative in short.
    I like the idea of it, but it would have to be a business. If it were some non for profit hippy commune, I could see the government burning us down like in Waco Texas.
    What about we all chip in our money and buy a marina to run as a business?
    We could even have a cheaper rates section of the marina for the MGTOW yachting club.
    We could have a club house, parking, restaurant, shops, permanent post boxes and whatever else we needed.
    As an added bonus you can use red diesel on boats (which has less tax on because its for agricultural machinery generally).
    There is a marina for sale in England now with a caravan park attached to it for all the land lubbers in the MGTOW yachting club.

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    Re: Will alternative housing get big in America?

    Warranties on any RV I could afford would be long expired. But anything can be fixed, rebuilt or upgraded.

    Class C motorhomes use light truck drivetrains and running gear. The larger class A's I would guess, use semi-truck technology. Light truck parts are going to be cheaper and easier to find. How much cheaper? I don't know, but it could be a lot. I bet a truck driver could tell you if you were interested. I know little about class A's except that you're getting into a whole new ball game. Because there's no demand for old ones, they sometimes sell really cheap. You might find one that's worth it. It would pay to have an expert look at it first before buying any class A. Anyone with reasonable car skills could look at a class C, but heavy trucks are different. I wouldn't mess with a class A unless they were practically giving it away.

    Class C's top out around 30 feet long, far as I know. For one person they got a fair amount of room, and I see them with 20-foot covered cargo trailers. Between RV and the trailer, you could haul a lot and have it reasonably secure. If you didn't want a trailer, you could tow your car, a lot a people do that. Be nice if you didn't have to move much, but it's not that big a deal.

    Small town trailer parks are a crapshoot. Parks have for the most part, a rep for being shitholes, and some are. In my village one park gets more police calls than the other four put together. But you could also find a bunch of old people who never cause trouble or make noise and go to bed early. Parks are slowly going away, especially in city's but are still fairly common in small towns. The one I used to live in was full the last time I went through.

    A place of your own would be better, but sometimes the park is the way to go. If you decide you don't like the area, it's easy to leave. Or stay there while working on your own digs. The park lets you try out the town before you commit to some acres of your own. And sometimes the park is all there is.
    Last edited by frog; September 17, 2022 at 1:59 PM.
    Every day I make the world a little bit worse.

  17. #17

    Re: Will alternative housing get big in America?

    I found Steve Lehto's probably first video warning about buying an RV. It's titled "Don't buy an RV," but it's more like a buyer beware video. He's done a ton of followup videos as well. In short, only buy an RV if you've studied up well and really know what you're doing.

    An older one that's out of warranty ... that's a tough call. If at all possible, I would have some kind of RV mechanic check it out. It's best if you know in advance if anything is wrong with it, like if you're going to need to have electrical work or have the shower fixed or whatever.

    https://youtu.be/IP_u2JR51_Y

    It can be done successfully. Just be very careful. Like he says in the video, you're much less protected than you are when buying a car.


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