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Thread: Recipes

  1. #1
    Senior Member MGTOWFOREVER's Avatar
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    Recipes

    Do you guys have any recipes you'd like to share? I'd like to share one. It involves a huge pasta salad that you'll be munching on for days.

    1 or 2 containers grape tomatos
    Half a jar of Spanish Olives
    1 or 2 bottles Italian dressing(I recommend Robust or House but it can be any kind)
    1lb Honey Ham
    1lb Pepperoni
    1lb cooked salami
    1lb Turkey breast
    1lb provolone cheese
    1lb Pepperjack cheese
    1lb Cooper Cheese
    Half a jar of parmasian powder cheese.
    A Box of Tri-color/Rainbow noodles

    Cook the noodles and as they are cooking , cut up the meat and cheese into squares. I order them at a local deli and ask for the meats & cheeses cut into slabs for chopping.They have EXCELLENT prices. You can also use the Kraft or Store brand bag cheeses if you prefer shredded. Dice the tomatoes and olives. Put all of the ingredients except noodles into one bowl. Add half the bottle of dressing and a little bit of the parmasian cheese. Once the noodles are cooked then drain them. Make sure to run the noodles under cold water for about a minute. If you don't then the cheeses will turn into this ugly mesh looking thing.Pour the noodles back into the pot. Pour your ingredient bowl into the pot of noodles. I use a stock pot for cooking the noodles. Shake the shit out of it so everything flows together. Add the remaining dressing and paramasian cheese. You can add croutons or anything else you'd like. Be creative. Put in the fridge for at least an 1 hour. ENJOY!

    You can also use a California blend veggies. I get a huge frozen bag of that for $2 and add about a 1/4 of it during the last 2 minutes of noodle cooking.You don't need to add the whole pounds of meat and cheeses. You can use half pounds(1 slab). I always buy by the pound so I can use the meats and cheese for other things such as chef salad, Macaroni & cheese, to grade for spaghetti, etc. Yes I love pastas and salads. LOL. Where I buy my ingredients cost me a total of $24 and I eat off it for around 4 days. So $6 a day.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Aintdealingwithyoshit's Avatar
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    Re: Recipes

    Tomato and egg stir-fry (西红柿炒鸡蛋, xi hong shi chao ji dan) is such a classic Chinese dish that it would feel strange not to write about it. Among the many simple and classic Chinese dishes, this one is the most comforting. It has become a must-have at almost every school and office cafeteria. Chinese people my age used to eat this dish all the time growing up, and it’s something we still crave once in a while.
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    Super Moderator Mr Wombat's Avatar
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    Re: Recipes

    I'ts Autumn down here, so just about time to dust off the small pressure cooker. Chopped-up soup vegetables, some dried soup mix (beans, lentils, barley - that sort of thing), couple of sausages and some mixed herbs. In the pressure cooker, no need to pre-soak the dried beans. Some stock from the supermarket. Oh, and some butter to make it rich.

    Hey - it's dinner.

    Another pressure-cooker recipe is some chicken wings (so cheap!), chicken or vegetable stock, mixed herbs, s&p, butter, and some potatoes or some corn or other soup vegetables.

    Cheap, nutritious, and best of all quick.

    Got the cooker off ebay. It's really small - two portion sized. Hasn't blown up yet.

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    Re: Recipes

    Ok, a real cook wouldn't feed this to his dog. Those guys at a chili cooking contest would like to hang me from the nearest tree. I only throw it out cause it wont poison you and store chili's even worse. Don't have to watch it cook all day either.

    1/2-1 lb. ground beef, 2 15 oz. cans low salt chili beans, 2 15 oz. cans low salt tomatoes, 1 10 oz. can diced tomatoes and green chili's, 1 15 oz. can tomato sauce. About 2 oz. chili powder. Drain the water off the tomato's and bean's.

    Fry your burger in a large pan. When it's done, turn off the heat, throw in the lot, and mix it up. Some in the freezer, some in the fridge, nuke as needed. Everybody likes theirs different, so change what you want. Carol Shelby's dead, but his chili seasoning's still for sale, I like to use half the chili powder on one pan.
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    Senior Member MGTOWFOREVER's Avatar
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    Re: Recipes

    Quote Originally Posted by frog View Post
    Ok, a real cook wouldn't feed this to his dog. Those guys at a chili cooking contest would like to hang me from the nearest tree. I only throw it out cause it wont poison you and store chili's even worse. Don't have to watch it cook all day either.

    1/2-1 lb. ground beef, 2 15 oz. cans low salt chili beans, 2 15 oz. cans low salt tomatoes, 1 10 oz. can diced tomatoes and green chili's, 1 15 oz. can tomato sauce. About 2 oz. chili powder. Drain the water off the tomato's and bean's.

    Fry your burger in a large pan. When it's done, turn off the heat, throw in the lot, and mix it up. Some in the freezer, some in the fridge, nuke as needed. Everybody likes theirs different, so change what you want. Carol Shelby's dead, but his chili seasoning's still for sale, I like to use half the chili powder on one pan.
    Add some cumin and sliced hot dogs and we got a deal.

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    Re: Recipes

    Quote Originally Posted by MGTOWFOREVER View Post
    Add some cumin and sliced hot dogs and we got a deal.
    A lot of people go for onions in their chili too, but I don't like them. I'll give yours a try.
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  7. #7
    Senior Member Aintdealingwithyoshit's Avatar
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    Re: Recipes

    Kungpao Chicken
    Ingredients


    • 1 pound skinless, boneless chicken breast halves - cut into chunks
    • 2 tablespoons white wine
    • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
    • 2 tablespoons sesame oil, divided
    • 2 tablespoons cornstarch, dissolved in 2 tablespoons water
    • 1 ounce hot chile paste


    • 1 teaspoon distilled white vinegar
    • 2 teaspoons brown sugar
    • 4 green onions, chopped
    • 1 tablespoon chopped garlic
    • 1 (8 ounce) can water chestnuts
    • 4 ounces chopped peanuts

    Directions

    • To Make Marinade: Combine 1 tablespoon wine, 1 tablespoon soy sauce, 1 tablespoon oil and 1 tablespoon cornstarch/water mixture and mix together. Place chicken pieces in a glass dish or bowl and add marinade. Toss to coat. Cover dish and place in refrigerator for about 30 minutes.
    • To Make Sauce: In a small bowl combine 1 tablespoon wine, 1 tablespoon soy sauce, 1 tablespoon oil, 1 tablespoon cornstarch/water mixture, chili paste, vinegar and sugar. Mix together and add green onion, garlic, water chestnuts and peanuts. In a medium skillet, heat sauce slowly until aromatic.
    • Meanwhile, remove chicken from marinade and saute in a large skillet until meat is white and juices run clear. When sauce is aromatic, add sauteed chicken to it and let simmer together until sauce thickens.
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    Senior Member Eiji's Avatar
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    Re: Recipes

    I wish I could post PDFs here..
    My radio club has an annual chili cookoff at our harvest party and the winning recipes get printed in the RF Carrier (our club newsletter)
    Last edited by Eiji; May 10, 2018 at 7:52 PM.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Eiji's Avatar
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    Re: Recipes

    Actually, we got one guy who makes chili that is so hot..... any hotter and we would have to measure the heat with a Geiger counter...
    Last edited by Eiji; May 14, 2018 at 9:32 PM.
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    Re: Recipes

    Wow ! You guys are amazing !

    Frank V.

  11. #11
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    Re: Recipes

    Kenobi's Red Beans & Rice: Easy and semi-quick..

    4 strips of bacon (torn into bite-size bits) rendered down for 40 mins
    1 onion (recommend medium to large pieces)
    Throw in some Weber's Garlic & Herb spices with some fresh ground black pepper
    1/2 cup of rice (dry, must boil separately with 1/2 cup of water) to finish it off

    Dish up a bowl and sit back and blast level 10 farts all night long! Enjoy!!

  12. #12

    Re: Recipes

    Lasagne
    With Meat Sauce (Beef)


    This recipe takes TIME.


    3lbs ground hamburger or chuck
    1 16 ox box of Lasagne Noodles
    1 32 oz. container of Ricotta Cheese (Whole Milk)
    2 or 3 eggs (will be blended into the Ricotta)
    2 16 oz blocks of whole Milk Mozarella Cheese
    2 16 oz blacks of Cheddar Cheese (Sharp or Very Sharp)
    2 or 3 cans of Tomato Sauce (optional substitution - 1 can of diced tomatoes)
    Salt, pepper, Sugar or brown sugar, Italian Seasoning
    Other: Grated Parmesan Cheese
    2 or 3 whole cloves of Garlic (or substitute Garlic powder, but if you do, you're missing out) - Do not use garlic Salt as you're already adding salt to the meat in preparation of the meat sauce.
    1 or 2 sticks of butter (not margarine - it really does make a difference to use actual butter)
    1 or 2 packages of italian, barbecue, french or other bread preference - rolls and buns are not recommended but will do if that's all you have.


    Garlic Prep:
    Peel all the garlic. It's a lot, but it is so very worth it.


    Use a garlic press to crush the garlic. Save the juice that it produces too. Oh, and don;t touch your eyes while doing this. Just don't.


    If you are having to dice all of this by hand, it's going to be a chore (it is either way), but a chore that may make you decide that a garlic press is worth the few dollars (and later a few dollars more for a better reliable one - I know).


    Those who don't add the diced/crushed cloves of garlic to the meat wind up adding more sugar. This will be a natural sweetener for the dish. It's really impressive, in my opinion, how well this blends in and affects the overall flavor of the meat.


    Cheeses Prep:
    Get a mixing bowl (medium to large) and add all of the ricotta. Add the eggs and blend with a spoon or fork. It'll take a little bit of effort, but not much to ensure the eggs are fully incorporated into the ricotta. Cover and place in refrigerator.


    Grate all your block cheeses. (I used to do this by hand, but a few years ago I bought a salad shooter and grating cheese doesn't take so long anymore. It's worth it given how much you'll be grating, but if you don't have one of these, set aside plenty of time to grate the cheese. You'll need a large bowl or two for these. Store in refrigerator or set aside on counter if trudging through the recipe all at once (seriously, this recipe needs patience - it is not a sprint, it is a marathon).


    Meat Sauce Prep:
    Brown ground beef. Pour off all oil with a strainer and press to push more oil out of the meat. Place drained meat back into pan.


    Salt to preference, but recommend two heaping tablespoons (4 even tablespoons) of KOSHER Salt.
    If using standard salt, halve the mount used and be sure to


    Black Pepper - - 1 or 2 even Tablespoons (1 heaping tablespoon = 2 even tablespoons in my kitchen) - You can add more or less to preference of course.


    1/4 cup white granulated sugar (or do brown sugar if you like).


    Blend well before adding Italian seasoning. Taste test for your preference on salty to sweet. Making sure the meat is properly flavored how YOU want it is key. You can add more or less of the salt/pepper/sugar - but I keep mine basic and don;t add a ton of other spices either. Having experimented over the years, the basic way has been the best for me. Some have told me that


    Italian seasoning - This blend works well, and when added to the above basic seasoning ingredients.
    I usually add a liberal amount (3 heaping or 6 even tablespoons - sometimes more, sometimes less. Add in stages and taste test so you don't over power the flavor for your recipe.


    Add 2/3 to 3/4 of the garlic you prepared to the meat. Blend in well. The other portion will be for the melted butter going on the toast.


    Once the meat has the right flavor to you, you'll add two cans of tomato sauce. Hunts is my go to brand, but Muir Glen is also good. You can add a third can of sauce to make it a bit more saucier, but you don't want your sauce dripping or too loose either.


    Optional - 1 can of dice tomatoes in place of 1 can of tomato sauce. I'd say fix is basic the first time you make this and then experiment with the diced add-in once you've got experience making this. Also depends on how much you're used to cooking / how comfortable you are in the kitchen.


    The meat sauce can now be set aside.


    Noodles Prep:
    I use a 3 quart pot for this. Fill it up about 75 to 80 percent.


    Add salt (Kosher or table). Optional - add a tablespoon of olive oil.
    Bring water to a boil and then add noodles. You can't just leave this alone. Keep an eye on the noodles and ensure they are covered by the water as the lower part of the noodles in the water soften. Once you can submerge all of the noodles, stir, but don't damage the noodles and make sure they don't scorch or stick to the bottom of the pot.


    Once the noodles are soft, remove from heat and let them rest in the high heat water for a few minutes.
    In your sink, run luke-warm to semi cool water. Pour as much of the boiling water as you can and then place pot under running water. Allow to overflow. This will cool the noodles, and in a short time, they'll become day to touch and the heat front he boiling water will be gone allowing you to touch and separate any noodles that might be sticking together.


    Leaving some water to cover the noodles helps, but pour it off as necessary and add it back if needed too. Warm water is better than cold, but you can use cold if you prefer.




    PREHEAT YOUR OVEN to 350 degrees.


    Building the Lasagne:
    Noodles on the bottom (1/2 of your noodles)
    Ricotta Layer (all or save half for secondary layer) I use all on the first layer.
    Grated Cheese Layer (about 25 percent of the grated cheese on top of the ricotta)
    Sprinkle in a little or a lot of parmesan evenly over this cheese layer (or none at all as you prefer)
    Meat Sauce Layer (about 40 to 50 percent of the meat evenly spread)
    Noodles layer (the remaining half) (and then Ricotta if you saved it for a secondary layer)
    Grated Cheese Layer (another 25 percent of the grated cheese) (1/3 of what is left)
    Sprinkle in a little or a lot of parmesan evenly over this cheese layer (or none at all as you prefer)
    Meat Sauce Layer (the rest of the meat sauce)
    Grated Cheese (the rest of the grated cheese - evenly as this 'tops' the lasagne.


    Melted Butter and Bread Prep:


    There's a lot of text here, but it's not nearly as complicated as all these words make it seem.


    Approximately 12 slices of bread (italian, french, barbecue) should be. You can double the recipe if needed for a larger group.


    Don't prep the butter or the bread until after the Lasagne is placed into the oven. Or maybe just right before you place the lasagne into the oven.


    Since time is a factor and you don't want your bread exposed to the air for a long time given the prep time of the other portions of this recipe, waiting to prepare this last is the best way to go. You could prep the butter ahead of time and leave the bread packaged, but it's better 'freshly melted'. Besides, you'll need a little time to allow it to cool, but not too much.


    To clarify or not clarify…You call. There's a film that ail be on top of the butter after it cools slightly when taken from the heat. You can re-blend it (some people I know love the flavor/intensity), or you can remove it and toss it. I do either now as its more of a preferential thing…Your decision.


    1 stick of butter (do not use margarine. real butter is best.
    You can use margarine in in a pinch, but it's just not the same.
    Use two sticks if you are doubling the recipe.
    Note - the same amount of garlic is still going to flavor this fine, so don't be worried about that, or try to compensate with added garlic salt or powder.


    Set stove top setting to 4 or 5. Place the garlic into the pan. We're not going to fully caramelize, but we want to pan toast it before we add the butter to melt. Add butter and as butter melts, the flavor of the garlic will blend into the butter. If using salted butter, you shouldn't need a dash of salt. Sprinkle in some pepper, and italian seasoning too. Remove from heat.


    Depending on when you lay your bread out on the pan, you may want to bring the butter back to the heat before spreading on the bread.


    A brush works well, but if you do not have a brush for the butter, you can use a tablespoon and carefully cover each piece of bread. It can be a bit more tedious depending on your comfort level with this technique, but it works if you don't have that brush to use. But do use the spoon if you don't have the brush. Dipping the bread is not recommended!


    Cooking the Lasagne:
    Cover the Lasagne with foil and place into preheated oven. Make sure not to put the foil directly onto the cheese, otherwise there will be a lot of cheese sticking to the foil when it comes off. Give the foil some space over the cheese and it will come off quickly and easily with no mess.


    Allow to cook for 30-40 minutes covered. Remove Foil. Allow to cook for additional 25 to 30 minutes.


    You may be inclined to brown the top and get it really bubbling and dark, but while that can look nice initially, it won't allow you to make the lasagne 'go the distance' unless it's all going to be eaten and given away to departing guests. Don't go for that dark crusty top. Keep it light and bubbly with just a hint of browning and it will last better, especially for reheating.


    Toasting the bread:
    Once the Lasagne comes out, you can turn the oven up to 400 degrees. Allow oven to reach higher temp, and allow the Lasagne to rest. Place the bread in the oven, and maybe even place that pan on the bottom so you don't scorch the underside of your bread (depends on your oven/element). Toast to heated softness of bread or to a light brown (too dark and the bread dries out quickly once it cools).


    Remove bread and place in separate holder/basket (to get it off the heated pan). Remember to turn your oven off. The lasagne is likely ready / rested enough to cut into to serve now.




    -------
    Obviously this is a huge recipe. It has a significant cost factor, as well as a significant time commitment. Give yourself time to put this all together. This isn't something you just come home from work and throw together.


    All during the prep process, be cleaning and rinsing and you will find that you won;t have a ton of clean up left to do. In many cases, my kitchen is cleaner when I am done prepping and cooking this than when I started. It takes some practice.


    You can halve this recipe - but it is not a directly halving either. You can also cut cost a bit by just halving the amount of Cheddar and Mozarella (and adjusting how you layer things, but a cheesy lasagne rocks.


    Cheese Only Lasagne?
    You can also fix a Cheese only lasagne. If you do that, you can still halve the Mozarella and Cheddar, but i recommend keeping the ricotta and 32 oz. You simple won;t be adding meat sauce to your layers.


    The 'sauce' can be made with a couple of cans of tomato sauce or maybe 1 can sauce, 1 can diced tomatoes.
    Bring it to a simmer and add pepper, garlic, , italian seasoning as desired. This makes for a good topper for the lasagne but it is also optional - as is the bread if you do not have the time or inclination.




    Lastly:
    The full recipe has always gone over well. You and a couple or few of buddies can eat for two or three days off of this thing, but it makes for a great group meal!


    It's easy to send people home with another serving or two so it doesn't go to waste - and this is not a meal you make and let go to waste.


    This thing isn't just a meal. It is a feast.
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  13. #13

    Re: Recipes

    Homemade Honey Mustard

    1/4 cup Mayonnaise
    3 Tablespoons Honey
    2 Tablespoons Mustard (Plain Yellow, Dijon, use what you like/have) (Substitute? Mustard powder)

    Blend with a small whisk or a fork. Enjoy.

    Substitutions
    If really necessary (desperate), you can substitute white or brown sugar, but mix very well. There is a major difference and there can be a chalkiness due to the sugar granules. Do not heat this in order to attempt to remove the chalkiness. Blend more until smooth.

    Real Honey is recommended. There are plenty of brands of honey, but I tend to stick with the quart size jars that have a dark color (from the grocery shelf or local producers directly). The best honey I have had was directly from local producers who keep bees. I do not much care for Sue Bee or any of that 'spun honey' wording on a lot of the generic honest products you see at the store. Depending on your area, it may be on the grocery shelf, or at your farmers market. Real Pure Honey is worth the effort to find.

    It's a simple base recipe. If you want to spice up your honey mustard and are not sure what to use, look at the ingredients on a preferred store bought bottle to get some ideas.

    Salt, Black pepper, Paprika, a dash of cinnamon, a dash of garlic, or even a few drops of actual garlic juice may be your thing. Again, experiment and find what you like. Onion Powder as well as other 'powders, but me mindful of thickness and blend fully.

    You can create a thicker consistency with corn starch, but add sparingly and blend fully so you do not add too much. You may need to add more honey to off set the cornstarch and that can help consistency remain. Mayo and mustard are only so thick, unless you go with a mustard powder to intensify the mustard flavor and enhance thickness.

    If you wish a thinner consistency, you can use oil (canola for example) instead of mayo. Whisk and blend well and you will have a honey mustard more fitting for a salad or pouring over another dish instead of 'dipping condiment'. Example: Oil Blend and pour over/drizzle over a pork roast as a topping flavor and then finish baking to allow it to brown onto the meat.
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  14. #14

    Re: Recipes

    Homemade Egg Drop Soup

    by Demosthenes March 5th, 2015, 9:21 am
    -----
    2 Eggs
    -----
    ->
    Beat two eggs in a cup or bowl (preferably with a small lip/pourable spout) and set aside.
    -----
    3 1/2 cups water - set aside in measuring cup or bowl
    -----
    The Stock Base:
    6 Tablespoons Canola Oil (replace with Corn Oil, Vegetable oil, etc.)
    3 heaping teaspoons of flour (self rising), If using non self rising, add a pinch of baking powder
    1/2 Teaspoon Salt
    1/8 Teaspoon Black Pepper
    1/8 Teaspoon MSG (Accent, or other brand - may skip but this does even out the flavors)
    1 Tablespoon Soy Sauce
    1 Teaspoon Chicken Bouillon (if using cubes, read for equivalent)
    1 Tablespoon Sugar
    -----
    ->
    Mix all stock base ingredients in a 1 1/2 qt. pot or larger. Stir together well.
    Stove temp should be set 50 to 60 percent of max high heat (setting 5 to 6).
    When mixture begins to bubble and thicken, add 1/2 cup water, blending in mixture thoroughly.

    Allow to re-thicken stirring occasionally as needed.
    The soy sauce will seem to darken the mix too much at this stage, and may look too dark even after the remaining water is added. Do not be concerned.

    Add the remaining water, stir well and allow to almost come to a boil. Turn heat down to 3 or 4.

    Pouring slowly, use a spoon or fork and stir (circular- counter clockwise for right handers) making sure to not pour in the egg too fast. A thin steady pouring stream of the beaten eggs is best. Once all the egg has been poured in, stir a few more seconds and then remove from heat.
    The color should now be more yellow. It will not look like it does coming from a chinese restaurant as they do use coloring.

    Soup is ready to eat.

    So far, I have only made this fresh and have not stored any for later use. (i.e. cooled/refrigerated and then reheated). Best guess is that this will keep for 1 day. If you haven't eaten it by the next day, you should just toss it and make it fresh. Best made when you're going to actually be eating it.

    If you're wanting to eat cheaper for a few days, this makes a good add on dish to a simple plain fried rice.

    I've found two eggs makes a good consistency. Feel free to play with the thickness of the stock base liquid. Or perhaps add a third egg if you want to adjust the recipe. I would do one or the other, but not both.


    Re: Homemade Egg Drop Soup

    Addendum:

    Found this out by accident. I was waiting for the water to reach the simmer/boiling moment, and I added the eggs in. Turns out, I was a little too soon in doing so. However, what did happen is that the eggs added were at sufficient heat to become a part of the base stock of the soup, but the heat was not hot enough for the egg flowering to form.

    The temperature did allow for the thickening to occur given the eggs in the base already, but if one wants a thicker soup, I still recommend some starch product and then waiting longer to add the eggs. your call. A little starch, or another egg or two. It's a liquid based meal so what you prefer is what its all about.

    I did add two more eggs and it came out fine. More eggy, but still a good flavor.

    If waiting for the heat to be right is an issue, just keep stirring periodically until the bubbling occurs whether you store or not.


    …and again, it may look way too brown with the soy sauce base and even after adding the water before adding the eggs, but once you pour in the egg, your soup should blend into a nice yellow color losing the brownish color from the soy sauce.
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  15. #15

    Re: Recipes

    Chicken Stock

    by Demosthenes March 10th, 2015, 4:11 pm
    This is 'less recipe' and more word of mouth knowledge.

    If you have baked a chicken (plain baked, instead of adding barbecue sauce for example. You can make a side of gravy or add any sauce you choose afterward. It's great for cooking ahead and you can 'sauce' the chicken as you please (gravy, barbecue sauce, honey mustard, etc.).

    What about the bones and left over meat?

    Pull off the meat remaining on the bird. Set it aside. You can freeze this and use it in a soup.

    In a large Cooking pot (3qt is good), place the bones and any remaining fat/skin into the pot. Fill the pot up with water and turn your stove on to a setting of about 3 initially.

    Once the water is heated (will take some time), turn down to 1 or 2 and let the pot sit there. Several hours, 3 to 6. You may want to add back some water if it is steaming off too much and then turn down the setting on the stove more to compensate.

    With time, you'll see a color difference in the water. After those several hours have passed, you can remove the pot from the stove (turn off the stove), and allow it to cool. Then remove the bones and any pieces of skin/fat and toss those. The water left will provide a good base for chicken and rice, or dumplings, or some other chicken based soup.

    It may take some time, but the effort is minimal except for removing the meat from the bird to begin with. That alone is worth the savings as sometimes you can pull off enough meat to make a soup even if what remains is mainly the bonier pieces of meat.

    Unless you're going to use the stock within a few days, or you have access to a canner for preserving foods, you should freeze the chicken stock for later use after it has cooled.

    Personal Usage: using the left overs from a baked chicken, I can usually have enough meat to make a Chicken and Rice Soup (4 to 6 quarts) - (separate recipe).
    Women don't owe men anything. Not a smile. Not sex, Not even empathy or compassion. Men don't owe women anything either. Not interest. Not resources. And definitely not commitment or children.
    -----
    Somewhere in a lonely hotel room there's a guy starting to realize that eternal fate has turned its back on him. It's 2AM.

  16. #16

    Re: Recipes

    Salisbury Steak w/Gravy

    by Demosthenes February 3rd, 2015, 4:28 pm
    Mix 2 lbs of hamburger with 1 packet of lipton onion mix and 2 tablespoons of onion powder.
    Add 1/2 teaspoon Salt, 1/2 tsp Black Pepper.
    Mix thoroughly.

    In a large baking dish or something equivalent in size to a broiler pan (without grill), patty the meat into 4 or 6 oz portions.

    Cover and place in refrigerator. Allow to sit several hours or overnight if possible. You can cook sooner, but the consistency of the 'steak' will be softer the sooner it is cooked because the onion mix will absorb moisture from the meat as the onion pieces swell.

    Bake until browned - Slow cook at 270, or go ahead an cook at 350 if you prefer. If you've let the meat sit, it should not matter, but if you are not allowing it to sit, then the lower temperature can help some.

    Once the meat is cooked, pour off the drippings into a pan for the gravy. You should not need to add any additional oil for the mix and the drippings will carry the flavors from the meat into the gravy.

    Set your stovetop to 4 or 5 (40 or 50 percent of maximum heat). Add 4 to 6 tablespoons of flour to the drippings in the pan. Mix in the flour until smooth and loos to begin bubbling before adding water - 2 to 4 cups depending upon amount being made.

    Adding hot water will prevent a major cool down, but again - as preferred. Allow the gravy to thicken.

    Add in flavoring/coloring if desired. Better Than Beef Bouillon does well for flavoring and making a rich brown color. Powdered or other means as desired for any additional beef flavoring should be too taste. Keep it minimal. You can always add more, but if you add to much it's more difficult to go back.

    Once the gravy is ready, set heat on stove to lowest setting, and place meat into gravy. If gravy begins to thicken too much, add in a bit more water to change consistency.

    Add vegetables - if going classic southern, mashed potatoes or a baked potato. If not, whatever vegetable(s) you prefer.

    Great for cooking ahead. The leftovers keep and reheat well. Adjust recipe for personal preference.
    Women don't owe men anything. Not a smile. Not sex, Not even empathy or compassion. Men don't owe women anything either. Not interest. Not resources. And definitely not commitment or children.
    -----
    Somewhere in a lonely hotel room there's a guy starting to realize that eternal fate has turned its back on him. It's 2AM.

  17. #17

    Re: Recipes

    Fried Chicken (skinless, or fried with skin on)

    by Demosthenes February 3rd, 2015, 5:49 pm
    The breading for fried chicken can take various forms. An easy no extra work breading I use consists of plain or self rising flour. Either will do.

    You'll want to use a large ziplock gallon size bag, plain brown paper bags work well, or even (unused) plastic bags (grocery store size) to place the flour in. Shaking for an initial coating is a lot easier and less time consuming than rolling and coating each piece by hand in a dish.

    Breading:
    Add 4 to 6 cups of flour. Add 4 to 6 tablespoons of iodized salt (Kosher salt is great).

    Chicken – If you don't know how to cut up a whole chicken, I suggest you learn. You may mess up a few chickens over time in the process, but there is a learning curve and it is worth knowing how to do.

    Assuming we have a cut up chicken (bought, or cut up yourself), You're going to want to pull the skin off if you want skinless fried chicken. It is a little time consuming but pretty straight forward. If you do remove the skin, it can be used for other dishes. Save the skin and set it aside for later, there are some things you can do with it.

    Once you have a cut up chicken (or you could use skinless chicken breasts as well), salt and pepper the meat, turn it over and do it again. Place the pieces in the bag and shake. You may want to step outside, but shake well, stop, open the bag, move the meat around, close and shake again. Let it sit (inside the bag in the flour).

    This is going to produce a thin, skinless, fried chicken crust (leaner – healthier) once fried.

    Cooking:
    In your frying pan (I use canola oil. Vegetable oil or Corn oil is fine but they can smoke a bit more at lower temps than with canola (note – canola used to be called rapeseed oil, but canola is the PC store name everyone now knows).

    Heat the oil on the stove (in the pan) at 5 or 6. I prefer 5 to 5 as six (6) can be too hot on some stoves. Your stove may be a bit different and your regional living location may effect this as well. You want the oil to seem to roll after it has heated. Another country kitchen method is to throw a dash of flour onto the oil after it is heated, if it sizzles instead of sits/settles, the oil is ready.

    Place the meat into the pan/cooker. The number of minutes can vary but I've found (in a pan) that 7 to 9 minutes on each side with one more turn for good measure to ensure that it is done is enough cooking time. You can use a thermometer, but be sure you're not pushing it all the way to the bone.

    When the meat is done:
    DO NOT USE PAPER TOWELS - Do not place chicken on paper towel to finish cooling and remove excess oil. Use a baking rack over a pan, brown paper bags opened up which absorb some oil, or aluminum foil (not great for collecting oil). Paper towels cause the meat (pork, chicken, whatever you are frying) to get soft and lose that fried crispness. Don't put fried chicken, pork chops, etc. on paper towels unless you want the underside of the meat in contact with the paper towel to get soft.

    Chicken Breasts. - and the size of chickens:
    Back in the day, 3 to 4 lbs was the size of a fryer. Today, most chickens are 5 lbs plus and finding the old scale fryer size can be very difficult, but it is not impossible. The breasts didn't used to be enormous and all the pieces would be tender and juicy on final cooking.

    Todays factory chickens are bigger and the breasts are just too damned big to fry efficiently as they can wind up pink in the middle because they are just so big. On top of the size, the injection of saline water pumps of the size as well. with larger chickens, I cut down the thighs and I slice ip the breasts into boneless pieces. You can even slice some meat off the legs if they are really big. If the bone in pieces are too big, they may not fry as well.

    You may wish to debone any bone in breast pieces, or at least reduce the size by half by cutting away some of the meat from the bulk of the breast. If you do so, you can long slice the strips of boneless meat and make chicken strips, or short slice them for nuggets. The same flouring process for the crust as above turns our well for these boneless cuts.

    If you wish a thick(er) crust:
    Do as above, but after, you're going to remove all the meat from the flour and set it aside. In a large bowl, add milk and 2 or 3 eggs. Mix thoroughly but don't over mix. Keep away form heat. Place the pieces into the liquid, and then roll in the bag of flour individually. This dredging will create a thicker crust. Dredge the meat and set it aside then heat oil and cook as before. Do not place meat into oil before the oil is properly heated.

    If you wish a bit if heat in your chicken:
    You can add some cayenne and red pepper at any stage – adding it onto the raw meat before flouring is helpful, but only to preference/taste. If you want it embedded in the crust, add to the liquid before you dredge through the second flour coating. you can then add tobasco or other hot sauces to the milk and egg mixture.

    What about the skin?:
    If you didn't buy skinless and you did skin the chicken, you can cut up the skin and fry it separately. It's a thing in the south depending on where you're from. But, skipping that, the best thing you can do with the skin is bake it fully in a small pan and save the oil that cooks off. It's great as an additive for chicken gravy, or chicken and rice soup, or chicken and dumplings. You can use bouillon, but the natural oils flavor soups better.

    What else?:
    After the oil cools and you pour it off, you'll find a small to large amount of flour has settled at the bottom of your pan. You can throw this away, and it is already heavy with oil, but you can also save this as it's a natural cooked chicken flavor - kinda bouillon-ish. If you have a kitchen oil keeper / strainer, you can simply pour off the oil and then save what is left once the oil is cool. It may seem odd to some, but the prices on flavorings in thre stores only keep going up and sometimes the base natural flavor you can create in a soup or other dish needs a bit of an extra

    This isn't a short easy meal to fix. The prep time is going to depend on the chicken you buy, whether it has to be cut up, whether you intend to remove the skin, etc..

    This is great for chicken strips and nuggets. Thicker strips/nuggets or 'skinny strips' work' well with this method of coating your chicken with a crust (thin or thick).
    Women don't owe men anything. Not a smile. Not sex, Not even empathy or compassion. Men don't owe women anything either. Not interest. Not resources. And definitely not commitment or children.
    -----
    Somewhere in a lonely hotel room there's a guy starting to realize that eternal fate has turned its back on him. It's 2AM.

  18. #18

    Re: Recipes

    Chicken and Rice Soup

    by Demosthenes March 10th, 2015, 4:25 pm
    5 or 6 quart slow cooker recommended

    Chicken Stock
    More water (quarts)
    1 to 2 cups of cooked chicken cut/torn from the bird.
    2 cups raw rice (added after it has been cooked)
    Salt, Pepper

    Using your own homemade chicken stock, or store-bought base if you must, add that base to a 5 or 6 quart cooker.

    Cook 2 cups of raw rice until done. Set aside. Be sure to wash the rice before cooking to remove the dissolvable starch, etc.

    Add your stock and additional water to your pot or slow cooker. Slow cookers make this far easier to manage in my opinion. Add Salt (Kosher or table is fine), Pepper.

    Don't be afraid to add more salt as needed. You're flavoring a lot of water and a little salt does not go along way in several quarts of water/stock. Add and taste to find out how much works for you. You can try 1 even tablespoon per 2 quarts of water, but again, this can bee too much or too little depending on the person cooking. Experiment and find what is best for you.

    You may also wish to add MSG (Accent Brand), but do not need to. (Southern cooking her so growing up this was a kitchen staple of some of my family and grandparents. It is not necessary.

    Add the chicken from a left over plain baked bird. A good amount is 1 to 2 cups of chicken meat (again, this entirely based on your preference. Some people like a lot of chicken, others only a little.

    Once you've heated and fully prepared the stock as your soup base and are satisfied, add the chicken. You may also go ahead and add the cooked rice. The cooked rice will absorb the flavors of the chicken soup stock and you will not have to wait for the rice to finish cooking inside the slow cooker. Warning also that rice cooked in a slow cooker can easily turn to mush, so adding wholly cooked rice prevents this as well.

    Once the rice is added, your soup is complete.

    If you wish, you can also add carrots, or celery, or other vegetables you are used to, to your chicken soup, but plain is what works for me.

    Simple meal. Takes a little effort considering the stock if you make it homemade, but it saves money and fully uses chicken you might otherwise throw out. For meal planners, recommend cooking within a day or two after a baked chicken meal.
    Women don't owe men anything. Not a smile. Not sex, Not even empathy or compassion. Men don't owe women anything either. Not interest. Not resources. And definitely not commitment or children.
    -----
    Somewhere in a lonely hotel room there's a guy starting to realize that eternal fate has turned its back on him. It's 2AM.

  19. #19
    Senior Member GregBO's Avatar
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    Re: Recipes

    Quote Originally Posted by MGTOWFOREVER View Post
    Do you guys have any recipes you'd like to share? I'd like to share one. It involves a huge pasta salad that you'll be munching on for days.

    . Where I buy my ingredients cost me a total of $24 and I eat off it for around 4 days. So $6 a day.
    Thanks for sharing this great recipe however I'll have to cut it in 1/4's to start as I do not have a mixing bowl for the original recipe.
    "My comfort animal is a Florida Alligator and I take great comfort every time he eats someone!" - PistolPete

    "​My father didn't tell me how to live; he lived, and let me watch him do it.​" - Clarence Buddinton Kelland

  20. #20
    Senior Member GregBO's Avatar
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    Easy Pasta Salad

    The below pasta salad is quick, easy and very tasty. Goes well with grilled NY Strip steaks and veggies (squash and root vegetables)
    6-8 servings, totally dependant upon the size of your serving spoon.

    Cooking time is about 1.5 hours and well worth the wait.

    1 (12 ounce) package uncooked tri-color rotini pasta
    10 slices bacon (I prefer thick cut)
    1 cup mayonnaise
    3 tablespoons dry ranch salad dressing mix
    1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
    1/2 teaspoon garlic pepper
    1/2 cup milk, or as needed
    1 large tomato, chopped (I prefer either beefsteak or mortgage lifter heirloom tomatoes)
    1 (4.25 ounce) can sliced black olives (I prefer Jumbo Kalamata - nonpitted)
    1 cup shredded sharp Cheddar cheese (I prefer Vermont White Cheddar)
    Black pepper to taste
    I will occassionally throw in a hard boiled egg for additional protein if I am eating it without a meat entree.

    Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a boil; cook rotini at a boil until tender yet firm to the bite, about 8 minutes; drain.
    Place bacon in a skillet over medium-high heat and cook until evenly brown. Drain and chop. ( I prefer mine to be slightly underdone so that it is not dry)
    In a large bowl, mix mayonnaise, ranch dressing mix, garlic powder, and garlic pepper. Stir in milk until smooth. Place rotini, bacon, tomato, black olives and cheese in bowl and toss to coat with dressing. Cover and chill at least 1 hour in the refrigerator. Toss with additional milk if the salad seems a little dry.

    Serve with toasted Italian Bread (EVOO)



    "My comfort animal is a Florida Alligator and I take great comfort every time he eats someone!" - PistolPete

    "​My father didn't tell me how to live; he lived, and let me watch him do it.​" - Clarence Buddinton Kelland


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