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  1. #1

    ‘Luxury beliefs’ are the latest status symbol for rich Americans

    "The upper class benefits socially from decrying its own privilege while paying no actual price for it... In the past, upper-class Americans used to display their social status with luxury goods. Today, they do it with luxury beliefs . . . The upper classes have found a clever solution to this problem: luxury beliefs. These are ideas and opinions that confer status on the rich at very little cost, while taking a toll on the lower class.
    Then there’s the luxury belief that individual decisions don’t matter much compared to random social forces, including luck. This belief is more common among many of my peers at Yale and Cambridge than the kids I grew up with in foster care or the women and men I served with in the military. The key message is that the outcomes of your life are beyond your control. This idea works to the benefit of the upper class and harms ordinary people.
    It is common to see students at prestigious universities work ceaselessly and then downplay the importance of tenacity. They perform an “aw, shucks” routine to suggest they just got lucky rather than accept credit for their efforts. This message is damaging. If disadvantaged people believe random chance is the key factor for success, they will be less likely to strive.
    ‘The key message is that the outcomes of your life are beyond your control’

    White privilege is the luxury belief that took me the longest to understand, because I grew up around poor whites. Often members of the upper-class claim that racial disparities stem from inherent advantages held by whites. Yet Asian Americans are more educated, have higher earnings and live longer than whites. Affluent whites are the most enthusiastic about the idea of white privilege, yet they are the least likely to incur any costs for promoting that belief. Rather, they raise their social standing by talking about their privilege.
    In other words, upper-class whites gain status by talking about their high status. When laws are enacted to combat white privilege, it won’t be the privileged whites who are harmed. Poor whites will bear the brunt.
    A former classmate from Yale recently told me “monogamy is kind of outdated” and not good for society. So I asked her what her background is and if she planned to marry.
    She said she comes from an affluent family and works at a well-known technology company. Yes, she personally intends to have a monogamous marriage — but quickly added that marriage shouldn’t have to be for everyone.
    She was raised by a traditional family. She planned on having a traditional family. But she maintained that traditional families are old-fashioned and society should “evolve” beyond them.

    https://nypost.com/2019/08/17/luxury-beliefs-are-the-latest-status-symbol-for-rich-americans/

    Example: "
    He then said he began suffering from moral anxiety after inheriting about $1.2 million, feeling alienated among his poorer friends who often joked about “some idiot rich kid with a trust fund.”" Oh, the suffering from getting $1.2 million inheritance!
    https://www.foxnews.com/entertainmen...ver-being-rich
    Last edited by CPRA; August 18, 2019 at 9:15 PM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Opaque's Avatar
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    Re: ‘Luxury beliefs’ are the latest status symbol for rich Americans

    It's always great when you convince someone that luck plays an overwhelming role in their situation in life, because it leads them to become lazy and not willing to investigate and find things out.

    Especially true with female attraction e.g 'women are mysterious'. Which leads men down the path of trying to be spontaneous, charming and so on, and with enough 'luck' I will get laid. When in fact the total opposite is true.

    There are of course a lot of things that come down to luck and just being in the right place at the right time, but female attraction, being financially stable aren't usually in that category.

  3. #3
    Administrator Unboxxed's Avatar
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    Re: ‘Luxury beliefs’ are the latest status symbol for rich Americans

    It's noticeable to me that the author thinks marriage ideas is a trickle-down from rich to poor, like they say about trickle-down economics. I'd have to see his supporting data.

    In the past, upper-class Americans used to display their social status with luxury goods. Today, they do it with luxury beliefs.
    So, he's saying one has replaced the other? I don't think so. People still buy what they can afford and that includes status purchases.

    This luxury belief contributed to the erosion of the family.
    A little? A lot? One percent maybe? He doesn't say. He's playing it safe.

    Affluent people seldom have kids out of wedlock but are more likely than others to express the luxury belief that doing so is of no consequence.
    Again, from where does he get this idea?

    Affluent whites are the most enthusiastic about the idea of white privilege, yet they are the least likely to incur any costs for promoting that belief.
    The author could explain what these costs look like when paid mostly by the non-affluent.

    Rather, they raise their social standing by talking about their privilege.
    Gee, I haven't seen that at all. For instance, the ones whom I see do that fall into two groups. The first group totally capitulate their personhood, showing me their susceptibility by being quick to swallow the kool-aid. The other group has an unspoken agenda. I know this because neither group provides a healthy counterpoint to the accusers, to sleuth out meaning and truth. Instead, they accede. Neither group raises their standing to my eyes.


    I think he could have fleshed out his opinions more. He's skipping across the water.

    I don't like this article, but I guess even a PhD gets to opine loosely. Maybe he's thought about all of this but for too long such that he forgets to relay his thought processes and writes down every third thought. Then again, it's in the NYP.
    The two most important days in your life are the day you were born and the day you find out why. - Mark Twain

    The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation.
    - Henry David Thoreau

    There are 10 types of people in the world - those who understand binary, and those who don't.

    Suitable for bookmarking: www.fakehatecrimes.org and www.breitbart.com/tag/hate-crime-hoax and register-her.net

  4. #4
    Senior Member mgtower's Avatar
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    Re: ‘Luxury beliefs’ are the latest status symbol for rich Americans

    Dan Aykroyd said it best in Trading Places, "it's not luck, Todd".

    When the law becomes so corrupt that nobody dare question it (in fear of reprisal), there tyranny has spawned and seeks to devour endlessly and relentlessly.MGTOW: Escaping and evading the jaws of injustice and tyranny, choosing liberty instead of a perilous death march through living hell!

  5. #5
    Senior Member Joetech's Avatar
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    Re: ‘Luxury beliefs’ are the latest status symbol for rich Americans

    Quote Originally Posted by Opaque View Post
    It's always great when you convince someone that luck plays an overwhelming role in their situation in life, because it leads them to become lazy and not willing to investigate and find things out.

    Especially true with female attraction e.g 'women are mysterious'. Which leads men down the path of trying to be spontaneous, charming and so on, and with enough 'luck' I will get laid. When in fact the total opposite is true.

    There are of course a lot of things that come down to luck and just being in the right place at the right time, but female attraction, being financially stable aren't usually in that category.
    I remember someone in southern California that told me I was "lucky" that I had a job. I told him about the six years I'd done in the Navy to prepare for that job. It wasn't luck, I told him. It was preparation. He just looked at me. What do you want? He was a drummer. (I think I'm gonna get banned for insulting drummers)
    "Don't follow in my footsteps. I stepped in something."


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