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  1. #1
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    What was your father like?

    We've had a few threads about our mothers. Which turned into train wrecks fast, by the way. Still think that's what tipped our NZ friend over the edge last summer. But what were our dads like? Inquiring minds want to know. Fathers day sounds like a good time.

    Living with my old man was a bastard, nobody but mom liked it much. He had a temper that would make your average rattlesnake look laid back, pissing this guy off was a big mistake. But he was always fair. Always. He was loyal, hardworking, and never chickenshit over anything. Very kindhearted too, though he hated anyone noticing. He lived it too, never expecting anything from you he wouldn't do himself.

    When I was little, he was scary. I stayed out of his way a lot though I never doubted he loved me dearly. Later he became my hero, specially after growing up and moving out. Things were great till he reached his late seventies. Then he got mean, probably some age related thing that the doc's never found. The last few years were tough, he'd piss me off on purpose sometimes. Nobody knows where to stick the knife like your father. Visits were short and I didn't say much. But it only lasted a few years and I ate it for mom's sake. He's been gone a long time now. I don't miss him, he had his time, and that time was long ago.
    Every day I make the world a little bit worse.

  2. #2

    Re: What was your father like?

    I lost my Father when I was 7, so Iw as raised by a single mother and grandmother and crazy Aunt, which is why I had so many 'Nice Guy Syndrome' issues.

    From what I remember, my Dad was a kind hearted man and a good provider and always emotionally supportive of my Mom. She always talked well of him and said she felt loved by him.

    He would go out of his way to buy us toys and took us to see Star Wars. I wish he had lived but he had gotten radiation treatment for his acne in the 1950's, which was the big thing at the time. He ended up with a brain tumor because of it that was too much for him.

  3. #3

    Re: What was your father like?

    My Dad is awesome. Really awesome. I didn't know it for the longest time, because even though he lived with us, my mother demonized him all the time to my brother and I in order to cover her own alcoholism, affairs, and reckless spending. He was by no means perfect, was irresponsible with money in his own ways, had his problems with alcohol (all of which was exacerbated by living with an entire family aligned against him) but he's always been there for me, and I wish I had always been there for him. I was just a little kid though, so I didn't know any better.

    Right now we're sitting under a shade tree working on getting an antique cast-iron gear-driven tiller running, cause it's basically indestructible. <3
    And it's nothing but wide open prairie...

    There's something very fun about MGTOW. In an odd sense, like charting a new territory of the mind, or rediscovering a long lost civilization. Occult knowledge, secret societies, cannibal natives (THOTS), it's all very exciting... lololol.

    Abandon the Abandoners.

  4. #4
    Super Moderator Mr Wombat's Avatar
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    Re: What was your father like?

    Dad was a violent retard. Low-functioning autistic, horribly strong. He couldn't cope with environmental stimulation, and two brothers in the house are a recipe for that, so he'd lash out.

    Not his fault. But for months after he died, the thought that he was finally dead would make me glow with happiness. It still feels pretty good.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Insidious_Sid's Avatar
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    Re: What was your father like?

    Dad is still around. He's a good man, but very very strong and dedicated in his blue-pill convictions. His blue-pill fuel came from religion, where he put his marriage above all else, and put up with crazy shit from my mother at all cost. As me and my siblings aged, we started to prod dad and challenge his behavior - and asked him why he would bow down to completely unreasonable behavior. He would defend her vehemently, and shut down any further discussion. It seems like my dad believes that mom somehow rescued HIM, saved him from eternal loneliness or something. Truth, at best, is maybe they saved eachother - or perhaps were terrible enablers for eachother.

    In any case, this created a problem for me growing up. I had a natural instinct towards looking for women I could fix, but at the same time had a complete loathing of any woman who was even a shred domineering. I think having a blue-pill dad who was a good dad who was always there and a good provider and father had a big downside. It is NOT the way to teach your kids how a marriage should work.

    My male children are redpill as fuck. I don't espouse these views around the children, and I even occasionally joke about getting a girlfriend, or wanting one. My sons say DO NOT DO IT DAD - that it's just a big bunch of bullshit. These are school-aged children and they're becoming hard-spined redpillers. And it's NOT coming from me. It's out there. It's spreading - it can't be stopped.

    MGTOW is just men who have no cause to be silent and instead laugh in the face of cowards, losers and pussy-whipped cucks throwing shame around. I'm quite proud of my ability to smile in the face of shame and ridicule. But, for every MGTOW I think there is 1,000 or 10,000 men who are just "In the know" and smart enough to just keep their mouths shut and play the new game: spin plates, but don't pay double for a half-eaten sandwich that fell off the carousel. DO NOT wife them up, or give them kids... they don't see the kids as YOURS they see them as THEIRS, or even just little financial vehicles. Women are fucking DEPLORABLE.

    But yes, in my case, I had a very very blue-pill dad who became subservient to a very domineering batshit crazy woman. She's not a BAD person, she's just unwell and needed a shit-tonne of control over everything and everyone around her. I've come to terms with it myself, and I get along with my mother now. But there is no question, for me - having these two as parents was pretty much a guarantee I would end up on the edges of society.

    That said, I'm really glad I'm just a run-of-the-mill Red Pilled MGTOW and not some psychotic ripper on a killing spree.

    I shit you not, I think guys like that come from homes like the one I grew up in.
    Last edited by Insidious_Sid; June 17, 2019 at 12:14 AM.
    - Feminism is Cancer.
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  6. #6
    Administrator Unboxxed's Avatar
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    Re: What was your father like?

    My dad was not aggressive. Some might say meek. My mom was on his case alot when we were young. She was overly critical of small things, like forgetting to put out the garbage cans before we all drove somewhere. Easily fixed, he got out of the car and did it, but the criticisms were there. We kids would mimic her and join in on the eye-rolling, background noises that signaled we sided with her. Why did we kids have to do that, except we saw her doing it. Why he married a divorcee with 4 kids, well my mom was a looker when she was young. Maybe husband #1 got fed up and left, I'll never know the true story. They had two more kids, and he was only A1C in the Air Force (three stripes). I remember the moment in the middle of one of her verbal attacks when I stepped outside of the picture and saw how mean she was and how we kids joined her only because that's what we did. I was 6 or 7.

    We were pretty poor, as far as income. Luckily the AF took care of medical or we'd really have hurt. In the 60s it was not uncommon for parents to leave their kids in the car (we had a station wagon) while they went in the grocery store to shop. You don't see that today. I can't say we were white trash, but as kids in the 60s we are awfully doggone nice, I'll say that. As a little kid, I was in perpetual need of a haircut, other kids would yell "Get a haircut!". Oh, the sixties.

    He liked hunting, fishing, camping, while I didn't do any of it. He liked to draw airplanes, from WWI to modern, and it was not unusual to find around the house the backs of envelopes nicely adorned with a Messerschmitt or a Sopwith Camel.

    Growing up, I was always the intellectual kid and I cannot say I knew my parents. I didn't pay attention to them in that way. Amazing I say that. My dad worked a second job to keep the money coming in. When my sisters hit their teens, they were boy-crazy. Living in vicinity of Air Force bases meant young horny strats (slang for servicemen. Air Force dependents were called strat brats) were everywhere and were a shitload of trouble, and my Dad showed his anti-female side (or was it anti-female-behavor side?) in the fights that would ensue. My sisters always were batshit crazy.

    As I headed towards 30 years old, life seemed as if all of us, Mom and Dad, us siblings, all entered into a new era where our past behaviors were forgotten, not spoken about, as we looked to treat each other with the skills we possessed today. Like a reset. Imagine the end of the movie Dr. Zhivago when they time-shift from the horse-and-buggy past to the closing credits of the hydroelectric power dam and how it represented a necessary evolution. Dad retired from the AF with 20 years, four stripes. Mom had long quit her hassling ways on Dad, at least in front of us, but they seemed to get along much better. He went to work for Boeing, drawing those exploded views of aircraft assemblies for their parts manuals. His artistry was no longer restricted to the backs of envelopes.

    For the next decades, Dad was just another guy, he and Mom would travel in their motor home. When I would fly in to see them on my vacation, we all would have a good time. He was up for anything. Once, when Dad greeted me at the concourse gate, I went to kiss him on the cheek and he leaned in for it, a fond memory I have.

    He passed away 20 years ago. The military played taps at his funeral and did the gun salute and I have to say that was the most gratifying part of that day. With all of the guff we saw him take over the years in the military, it's too bad that he didn't get to see the military finally showing him some flat out respect.

    A few years after he passed, one of my brothers and I visited his former next-door neighbor, a gruff guy whom Dad had befriended. He told us that Dad had confided in him that, if Dad had to do it over again, he never would have got married. Dad said that to him. It hurt to hear that, but I didn't let it hurt too long because I knew my Dad had a right to think that, as we kids and Mom put him through a lot of bullshit in his life. He worked his 3-stripes job plus a night job to keep us six kids fed. Who would do that nowadays. He didn't bail. It's possible to have major regret yet love people in your life. I know he loved me.

    Every year on Fathers Day I post a tribute to him in Craigslist Rants & Raves. (I do the same for Mom on Mothers Day.) I posted his last night. I miss my Dad very much. As a get older, I see in myself facing decisions that he had to make back then while, in my immature youth, I didn't understand him.

    I do understand him now, and I hope he knows that. I love and miss my Dad.

    Gee, I guess I've written another tribute here, didn't I?
    The two most important days in your life are the day you were born and the day you find out why. - Mark Twain

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    - Henry David Thoreau

    There are 10 types of people in the world - those who understand binary, and those who don't.

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  7. #7
    Senior Member Jackal's Avatar
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    Re: What was your father like?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Wombat View Post
    Dad was a violent retard. Low-functioning autistic, horribly strong. He couldn't cope with environmental stimulation, and two brothers in the house are a recipe for that, so he'd lash out.

    Not his fault. But for months after he died, the thought that he was finally dead would make me glow with happiness. It still feels pretty good.
    Same here, a pain in the ass to deal with for countless reasons, when he died I felt relieved.

    I felt like a further problem was no longer there and that it solved itself forever.

  8. #8
    Member Hoppes#9's Avatar
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    Re: What was your father like?

    Dad was a good guy. He was a submariner crew member, (a boomer) during the Korean war.
    He was peaceful and loyal to his friends. He'd go over the top to help a person...even when it wound up costing him. I never understood that trait until I was much older.
    He was a fair and honest man yet took no shit from anybody. A peaceful man as I said but when you looked at him and he gave you that gaze...you knew not to push him. He would come unglued and beat the shit out of any that wronged his family or him.
    But he did tolerate a big bag of shit from my mother and also his second wife. Even though they would bitch and complain...he went on and did what the hell he wanted too. I admired that even way back then. This man taught me most of what I know...except for MGTOW.
    Today I think he would maybe be a purple -pill..... He loved the ladies but also was aware of the dangers.

    One of the best pieces of advice he gave me...But I didn't listen...was "Son leave everything with Titties and tires,...cunts and carburetors alone, you will keep your sanity and your money"

    My dad died at 50... If alive today he'd be in his 80's......but I think he would support MGTOW 100%!

  9. #9
    Senior Member MGTOWFOREVER's Avatar
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    Re: What was your father like?

    My dad was a hard worker but a total blue pilled cuck. He died suddenly of brain cancer. He was the guy who always made sure we were taking care of but would let the old lady walk all over him. She would make damn sure that she would pick a fight with him when he was drinking. I use to think he was an evil coward for hitting women but now I forgive him and understand. He was always made out so wrong but he wasent that bad.

    Back in high school I was a HUGE Good charlotte fan. I use to listen to this song until I warped the CD. One day I got so depressed that I went to his grave with a bottle of Jagermeister and sang the lyrics to him.


  10. #10
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    Re: What was your father like?

    Radiation treatment for Acne? Wow, that's hard.

    I'd like to thank and congratulate Jackal and Mr. Wombat for not following in the family footsteps. Crazy as it sounds, there's lots a guys who didn't like their fathers, yet grew up to be quite a bit like them just the same. Lucky for me, my father broke the chains too. Not everybody does.

    Once when I was in my thirties the old man told me he thought I'd be happier with a family. Then he dropped it and never mentioned it again. Gotta tell ya guys, I was awful lucky sometimes. Everybody else just cant resist nagging you. I've watched friends get it bad sometimes.

    A military type, eh Payphone? There were dependents around during my Army days, but I had no contact with e'm. A friend dated one for awhile, but that was far too risky for my blood. Though mine was never a military family, living with the old man was something akin to being around a lifer. So I tend to identify with dependents. A woman named Mary Edwards Wertsch grew up in a military family and wrote a book called "Military Brats" that sent shivers up my spine. It's bound to be out of print but there's likely used ones online. Mines electronic, from Barnes & Noble.
    Every day I make the world a little bit worse.

  11. #11
    Senior Member Alik Sakharov's Avatar
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    Re: What was your father like?

    This is a top thread . Like would you like that there a thing or two different about your father or a mother and it would be perfect and you would grow perfect . And unicorns .

    When i think that i would have loved my dad to be just that little bit stronger ...but as adult i know that i would have died in my early teens because the diplomacy saved my life more than a few times .

    But its terrible , the fights between parents is the one reason people do not grow up happy .

    That much we know males and females cant live in one space for any period of time , its anti nature . When a honeymoon period , yes , it is nice . But thats it .
    You cant keep a player down!
    Dont hate him , hate your fuking bullshit game !

  12. #12
    Senior Member Joetech's Avatar
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    Re: What was your father like?

    Unfortunately for me my parents should have never had kids. I hardly spoke to my dad there at the end. He passed in 1997.
    "Don't follow in my footsteps. I stepped in something."

  13. #13
    Senior Member Insidious_Sid's Avatar
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    Re: What was your father like?

    Quote Originally Posted by Joetech View Post
    Unfortunately for me my parents should have never had kids. I hardly spoke to my dad there at the end. He passed in 1997.
    I used to feel this way a lot as a kid... like... why the fuck was I born? Things were very chaotic... a lot of anxiety and stress. It seemed that just being around was a terrible burden - a huge source of anxiety for mother. She always feared the worst happening to us, to the point we could not go places other kids were free to go. But the need to control her kids was far more insidious than that. She micromanaged many things in our lives, which I think led to an issue with some of us having difficulty establishing a solid ground for our own identity. Some symptoms of having controlling parents are difficulty making decisions, not knowing what one wants, lacking ambition, drive, direction... being adrift, rudderless. She liked us best when we were in our rooms, quietly reading a book - safe, and in a place where she knew nothing could harm us (except a rare airborne pathogen or a meteorite...) I used to say to therapists that my mother valued her children like glass pieces in a menagerie, and that to protect us from harm she had to keep us safe, up on a high shelf.

    Like I said. I don't condone school and office shooters, but I have a vague sense of where they might actually come from... It's kind of scary, really, but there seems to be this one piece missing (or not missing) that makes the difference. That "almost solved" Rubik's cube... Anyways...

    Yeah, when you start reading up on attachment theory, and what kinds of affects parents have on their kids, it's quite shocking really. It's almost as if parents are meant to fuck us up to a certain extent. After all, parents want to pass on their learnings on how to deal with life, and with those learnings could come a lot of dysfunction or maladaptive adjustment. Not everything parents learn is something to be passed onto the children. How I am Red Pilling my kids (boys) is a slow process where I show them how to live as a decent man, without a relationship. Ultimately it will be up to them - I don't want to indoctrinate my kids. Interestingly, the Red Pill philosophy seems to be in the air and water now. It can't be stopped - I don't think I even need to worry about it. It's as inevitable as death and taxes and as normal as rain.

    What's really a mind fuck in psychology is how you can reverse engineer the sorts of partners you are/were drawn or attracted to based on one or both parents.

    At best, relationships are just really fucking messy.

    In my late teens / early 20's I vowed I would actually never have kids. I believed this was the only way to stop the familial cycle of madness. Also, I thought of it as one way (as a male) I could get back at my mother - to deny her grandchildren. (Pretty fucked up, right?!)

    So now, I often have terrible feelings of guilt, sadness, regret, etc. when it comes to my own kids. I think my relationship with them is better than what I had, certainly different, if not better. I try to give my children (age and situation appropriate) choices, and don't dictate how they dress, or keep their hair. They can decorate their rooms as they like. I encourage them to do things THEY like to do, rather than what I THINK they should do. Granted, we "put" them in swimming but I think most parents do that lol.

    If parents are not totally indifferent or totally abusive, then I'm pretty sure they don't get up every morning INTENDING to fuck up their kids. But, because parents are human, I think more often than not they ultimately do just that. Thing is - how many ways to deal with life and live are positive? How many are not? How many are no longer relevant now?

    All I know is this: If I can't keep my boys from dangling themselves over the divorce meat-grinder, at a minimum I owe them the truth about how that fucking game works and what men look like coming out the other side of it. Romance, tradition... those warm fuzzy feelz have no place in the discussion. This is a life or death thing, not a touchy feely thing.

    No, you do NOT have to "follow your heart" into a meat grinder, my dear Sons. Women have abandoned their end of the deal. There is no virtue nor honor in keeping up your half of the bargain alone. Ironically, instead of praise, they'll ridicule you and say "You just chose wrong".

    My life's mission now is to help young men "not choose wrong".
    Last edited by Insidious_Sid; June 18, 2019 at 4:49 PM.
    - Feminism is Cancer.
    - Where have all the good men gone? Away. Far far away... from you.
    - NAWALT? Maybe, but EWALT means Russian Roulette is a much safer bet...

  14. #14
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    Re: What was your father like?

    Dad was old school, ruled w/an iron fist. My brother said he got PTSD from growing up, even went to counseling recently. Mom and Dad had separate beds by the time I was 6, separate bedrooms by the time I was 14.
    There was very little affection or support in my household, moved out at 17. So I chased the temporary affection and support women could offer, it was new to me and I liked it. Even after getting kicked, mangled and stepped on , I still got up for more. That's why it took me so many years to learn my lessons about women

  15. #15
    Senior Member Alik Sakharov's Avatar
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    Re: What was your father like?

    Quote Originally Posted by Joetech View Post
    Unfortunately for me my parents should have never had kids. I hardly spoke to my dad there at the end. He passed in 1997.
    You fucking have to get a license to own a dog ... my god ...and dogs are petty creatures compared to people .

    This is crazy . In nature only the best breed . Only THE best and a journeyman here and there
    You cant keep a player down!
    Dont hate him , hate your fuking bullshit game !

  16. #16
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    Re: What was your father like?

    My dad was totally blue pill. I never respected him. Not because he was blue pill, but because I was. My mother poisoned our ears regarding my father from the earliest memory. She never respected him, and she taught us kids to do the same.

    He tried his best with his blue pill understanding, but we all know how that doesn't work. Now that I look back, I can see that he had a good heart. His chief blue pill weakness was that he craved validation, especially from my mother. Obviously, she never gave him an ounce of that. Is was nothing but criticism from sun up till sun down.

    The blue pill is incredibly toxic to masculinity. For any of you guys that hate your father, take another look back and see if you can understand what he was going through. I'm not trying to be an apologist for them. God knows my father had his flaws, but he damn sure meant well. Extend a little empathy backward. They came up during much tougher times, and they had no internet forum to vent on. It turned a lot of them into violent drunks because they simply had no other outlet for their blue-pill rage.

    Thank god we live in more enlightened times.

  17. #17
    Senior Member ChauvinistPig's Avatar
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    Re: What was your father like?

    Like Tangent, I lost my old man at a young age. I played that "nice guy" bullshit too with the usual predictable results. Luckily, he implanted enough toxic masculinity in me that I always had half a spine even at max blue pill.

    Introduce your male children to John Wayne movies especially if you're a single mother. He will show your boys what a proper man is.

    For me, WWJD means what would John do.

    @Frog: My mom was as close to a Unicorn as any man could ever hope to find. God, was I in for a big, bad surprise when the hormones kicked in on me. In her latter years, my mom told me she understood my never marrying given the state of today's "liberated" women.
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    Re: What was your father like?


  19. #19
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    Re: What was your father like?


  20. #20

    Re: What was your father like?

    an honorable man, no doubts. My ex girlfriends - they were very trobuled chicks - used to criticise the tight cohesion that exists inside my family. They would get mad with meaningless things and say that I'm some sort of momma's boy, as their families, on the other hand, were always broken. I sort of see that now, that I have to be greateful these days. But I notice that he handles mother quite well, responding in absolute silence when her "women issues" speak too loud. But she is a good mother too. If they pass before me, the grief will be very painfull.


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