Despite it being a violation of policy, law enforcement across the country continues to get busted creating fake social media accounts to monitor citizens.

A scathing new report shows that Facebook is teeming with face accounts—created by police officers to track their adversaries. According to Facebook’s official terms of use, they are against the rules, but cops seemingly couldn’t care less and keep making them anyway.
A recent case out of Memphis exposed the trend of fake law enforcement accounts when protesters reacted to the police killing of 19-year-old Darrius Stewart.
A lawsuit filed by the ACLU of Tennessee uncovered evidence that the police used what they referred to as a “Bob Smith” account to gather intelligence on activists.
According to a report out of NBC,
Smith acted as if he supported the protesters, and, slowly, they let him into their online community. Over the next three years, dozens of them accepted his friend requests, allowing him to observe private discussions over marches, rallies and demonstrations. In public postings and private messages he described himself as a far-left Democrat, a “fellow protester” and a “man of color.”
But Smith was not real. He was the creation of a white detective in the Memphis Police Department’s Office of Homeland Security whose job was to keep tabs on local activists across the spectrum, from Black Lives Matter to Confederate sympathizers. (MGTOWers?)
The detective, Tim Reynolds, outed himself in August under questioning by the American Civil Liberties Union of Tennessee, which sued the police department for allegedly violating a 1978 agreement that prohibited police from conducting surveillance of lawful protests. The revelation validated many activists’ distrust of local authorities. It also provided a rare look into the ways American law enforcement operates online, taking advantage of a loosely regulated social media landscape — and citizens’ casual relinquishing of their privacy — to expand monitoring of the public.
Because fake Facebook accounts are not against the law, there is no recourse other than reporting them to Facebook. However, when one goes down, another pops up in its place . . . Out of 1,221 federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies that use social media today, more than 80% of the responding officials said social media was a powerful tool for crime-fighting and that “creating personas or profiles on social media outlets for use in law enforcement activities is ethical.”

The good news is that while law enforcement continues to skirt the policies of social media companies to spy on you, there are ways to spot them. Below is a list of ways to spot fake Facebook accounts . . . "
https://thefreethoughtproject.com/fa...ent-spot-them/